VSL:WEB // See the movie Stanley Kubrick sort of, almost made

After Stanley Kubrick wrapped production on 1975’s Barry Lyndon — a film groundbreaking in its use of superfast retrofitted lenses

After Stanley Kubrick wrapped production on 1975’s Barry Lyndon — a film groundbreaking in its use of superfast retrofitted lenses to shoot by candlelight — the feverishly meticulous director wanted his next project to incorporate the newest filmmaking toy: the Steadicam. Cut to 30 years later, and that low-flying and terrifying ride we take behind Danny’s trike in The Shining still stands as maybe the best use of that moviemaking tool ever.

Britain’s Channel 4, which is airing a series of ten Kubrick films this summer, has created a lovingly fun promotional spot based on the behind-the-scenes world of The Shining. You’ll surf Kubrick’s POV as he winds his way through eerily familiar sets and past actors cast for their resemblance to actual 30-years-ago crew members. The 65-second continuous shot took two days to film, and the attention to detail would surely make the late master proud. But . . . only two days? Kubrick would’ve taken ten.

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