Querrey Feels No Pressure

There have been a lot of questions at this year’s Open about the state of American men’s tennis. Asked where he expected the American game to be in five years, Vince Spadea, who lost in five sets to Marat Safin yesterday, said that there are always one or two players who rise above the rest.

“So I think there’s probably going to be one or two of those guys,” he said. “I don’t know. It could be maybe Querrey. He’s got to do it soon. Maybe Young if he gets organized and focused. There’s a couple of younger players, Harrison. I haven’t really studied the young, young guys. I don’t really know them.”

Querrey himself, after upsetting Tomas Berdych in straight sets, was asked whether he felt the urgency, as an American, to ascend to a certain level. “I can feel it a little bit,” he answered. “It’s kind of tough, because for the last — not the last three years but before that, since — I mean, 1970 to 2005, America pretty much had a No. 1 ranked player. Someone who was always running to win a Slam. We haven’t had that the last couple years. Andy and James and Mardy and I, John Isner, we’re all working hard, and hopefully we can get to the point where it could be like it was 10 years ago and we could have three guys in the top 10. I don’t really feel any pressure by it or anything.”

But he’s clearly given it some thought.

Querrey Feels No Pressure