VSL:SCIENCE // See impossible objects

Most of the visual illusions we see are two-dimensional. But Scientific American’s “Sculpting the Impossible” slide show brings out-of-the-question objects

Most of the visual illusions we see are two-dimensional. But Scientific American’s “Sculpting the Impossible” slide show brings out-of-the-question objects to real, three-dimensional life.

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Take the geometrically impossible Penrose triangle (which contains three right angles). Or the LEGO constructions that painstakingly replicate M. C. Escher’s trickiest architectural drawings. Our favorite illusion? Shigeo Fukada’s Lunch With a Helmet On, which turns 848 forks, knives, and spoons into the perfect silhouette of a motorcycle.

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VSL:SCIENCE // See impossible objects