The Richard Aborn Experiment

If it weren’t for Richard Aborn, the Manhattan district attorney election would look a lot like it did in 2005,

If it weren’t for Richard Aborn, the Manhattan district attorney election would look a lot like it did in 2005, when Leslie Crocker Snyder challenged Robert Morganthau.
This year, it’s Crocker Snyder vs. former Morgenthau aide and protégé Cy Vance—and Aborn, who is trying hard to turn his relative obscurity into an asset.
“Well, as you know, there hasn’t been an open primary here in 35 years,” he told me recently. “No matter what framework you set up for me, there’d be no precedent because he’s [Morgenthau] been in office for so long. So, there is no historical framework.”
Unusually, he’s betting that he can win a race for a crime-fighting post not by appealing to the public’s fear of rising crime, but by focusing on traditional liberal ideas about the rehabilitation of prisoners and the root causes of criminal misconduct.

The Richard Aborn Experiment