Without a Democratic Primary, Where Will the Housing Ideas Come From?

In the world of low- and moderate-income housing, the last two mayoral campaigns were fruitful ones.
Particularly in the competitive Democratic primaries, two fields of candidates launched arms races of sorts on housing, ultimately presenting plans that called for huge infusions of new money and an array of new policies long pushed by advocates. The Bloomberg campaign countered with similar plans of its own, particularly in 2005; now many of the campaign ideas are city policy.
So as the 2009 mayoral election nears with only one well-financed candidate actively seeking the Democratic nomination—Comptroller Bill Thompson—could a noncompetitive mayoral primary take a toll on the innovation and idea-borrowing that traditionally occurs in such campaigns on housing policy?
The spring and summer of election years, after all, are when housing advocates tend to push policy papers on campaigns and hold candidate forums.

Without a Democratic Primary, Where Will the Housing Ideas Come From?