Morning Read: Debating Last Night, Burying 2013

Michael Bloomberg hit Bill Thompson for wanting to raise taxes and mishandling schools. Thompson got him on giving money to Cory Booker.

 

Bloomberg defended the Booker contribution, and praised other people he likes, like Adrian Fenty and whatshisname in Detroit.

The Booker story was the buzz among reporters watching the debate at ABC.

John Schiumo: “Bloomberg said his opponent will raise taxes. Thompson said his opponent HAS raised taxes.”

Bloomberg defended the Yankee stadium subsidies and said Thompson only created “patronage jobs.”

Thompson “struggled to define himself” says the AP.

I would not raise taxes,” Thompson said.

No knockouts.

Michael Powell doesn’t see Bloomberg’s purpose, but catches this memorable line: “It’s very easy to say I feel your pain. That’s not what we need.”

Lisberg and Einhorn didn’t see Thompson wave the partisan flag.

One Harlem resident ditched Thompson after he said Bloomberg deserved a D- grade.

Kenneth Sherrill said Thompson did better than last time.

Steve Kornacki notes that Bloomberg didn’t do much to promote his major speech about third-term initiatives.

A frequent visitor from Canada gets behind Bloomberg.

A writer from Arizona hears Fred Siegel lament about being part of the “extinct tribe of small-government Democrats.”

Bill Thompson got a loan from a bank connected to big labor.

Christine Quinn’s endorsement of Thompson was really a “nod to reality” for ambitious Democrats here.

Bloomberg ads where I didn’t expect them: during the BET hip-hop awards, and on Drudge.

Michael Goodwin calls Thompson a hypocrite for criticizing, then echoing, Rudy Giuliani.

David Seifman calls Al Sharpton and Charles Barron’s endorsement against Al Vann “stunning.”

DC37 has to put up $800,000 as it tries saving 530 members from being fired.

Eric Ulrich’s Democratic opponent owes state taxes on a defunct business.

That opponent, Frank Gulluscio, also has a blemish on his education record.

Tom Ognibene doesn’t like party labels, and Dan Holloran is complaining about the Queens Tribune.

Peter Vallone Jr. and Simcha Felder want public money to protect private schools.

A Democrat in Dutchess County wasn’t really endorsed by the Independence Party.

Juan Gonzalez questions a land deal in the Bronx.

A cop-on-cop confrontation gets messy.

Thomas Friedman says Afgahnistan’s recovery starts with the US standing down.

The Times wonders if we can feed 9.1 billion people by 2050.

And pictured above are Eddie Castell and Howard Wolfson, spinning after last night’s debate.

Morning Read: Debating Last Night, Burying 2013