Morning Read, Upstate: More M.T.A. Problems

Andrew Cuomo says he should have the power to police the state legislature.

U.S. Attorney Andrew Baxter said he’s still looking at the legislature, and added this: “The state ethics and disclosure laws make it much harder for law enforcement to investigate and prosecute public corruption involving state officials. There’s just so little transparency in the legislative process that it takes an enormous amount of time and effort to uncover what really happened.”

David Paterson signed a bill creating a new pension tier.

The News calls it “a rare sign of intelligent life in Albany.”

Paterson brags it will save $35 billion over 30 years.

Some officials are skeptical.

Paterson said he could maybe, kind of, see Comptroller Eliot Spitzer.

Short on cash, the M.T.A. says it might eliminate two subway lines and several bus lines.

Nicole Gelinas says she warned us the M.T.A. payroll tax was extremely volatile.

“The time for chatter is done, and I am willing to place my political career on the line to start a formalized tax revolt,” Assemblyman Greg Ball said of the payroll tax. “We will replace pitchforks with online petitions, but the impact will be the same and this gesture will be a wakeup call to the tax-and-spend crowd in Albany that we have reached our breaking point.”

Harold Ickes is on team Paterson.

Atlantic Yards foes see hope in the Columbia eminent domain decision.

Bronx Democrats aren’t necessarily targeting Senator Pedro Espada Jr.

The Times Union is unhappy that New York is raiding its Regional Greenouse Gas Initiative fund.

The Bloomberg administration and police and fire union officials are debating the effectiveness of the 911 dispatch system.

Bloomberg accused the Poopsatuck tribe of secretly selling cigarettes, defying a court order.

The mayor and Chris Christie are now friends.

Rick Lazio, in a swing through the North Country, said New York is “at the tipping point.”

State officials are looking into a $500 million insurance fraud claim.

CMA Consulting Services will have to disclose Joe Bruno’s conviction for five years.

Josh Cherwin will replace Rob Calentine as the head of the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee in New York.

Paterson said increased license plate fees will be off the table in next year’s budget.

The Port Authority will lay off 150 people.

There’s now enough swine flu vaccine to go around.

And below, video of Greg Ball’s tax revolt declaration: Morning Read, Upstate: More M.T.A. Problems