‘Post-Partisan’ Levy Enjoys Meeting With G.O.P., Stays Neutral on Bishop

Democratic Suffolk County Leader Steve Levy is heading back home from what he considered a rather receptive meeting with the

Democratic Suffolk County Leader Steve Levy is heading back home from what he considered a rather receptive meeting with the Republican leaders in Albany about his possible run for governor.

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“I was invited to come to this meeting. So, obviously there was an interest on their part,” Levy told me in a telephone interview.

“Gauging from the response I got, they were very much intrigued by the specific nature of the way I would go about saving the state from bankruptcy. I was appealing to them from the perspective of a fiscal conservative.”

Levy described himself to me as a “post-partisan,” candidate.

Republicans interest in Levy is not going over well with some who say the party already has a candidate, Rick Lazio, and that there’s no need to draft a Democrat to run on their line. One theory going around is that State G.O.P. Chairman Ed Cox is entertaining Levy’s candidacy in a way to help his son, Chris Cox, in a congressional race that’s taking place in Levy’s backyard.

I asked Levy if he’s supporting incumbent Democratic Rep. Tim Bishop, or either of his two Republican challengers, Cox or Randy Altschuler.

The answer: no one.

“I’ve purposely made it a point to not focus on any other race but my own because it serves to be a distraction,” Levy said.

“I’m focused like a laser beam on talking about my plan to save New York from fiscal insolvency. I think I’m the best guy to do that, so I’ve been staying away from any other political races right now. There will be time for that down the road.”

When I asked if his neutrality might send upset Tim Bishop, Levy disagreed.

“I didn’t say I’m supporting or not supporting anyone right at this point. I just think it’s very important to stay focused on what my plan is and not to get distracted with the controversies of other individuals.”

 

‘Post-Partisan’ Levy Enjoys Meeting With G.O.P., Stays Neutral on Bishop