Morning Read: Arizona Protest, Serrano & Velazquez

Hispanic lawmakers from New York will chain themselves to a fence in Arizona to protest a new law allowing officials to demand proof of citizenship.

John Liu says the Economic Development Corporation owes the city about $125 million.

New York City isn’t getting much in stimulus funds.

Jose Serrano and Nydia Velazquez threaten to pull support for Carolyn Maloney’s 9/11 bill if it bars illegal immigrants from health care access.

Larry Scott Blackmon considers a race against Bill Perkins.

Kevin Parker goes bananas.

“Human volcano.”

Daily News: “Clearly, the anger management counseling that Parker underwent after his 2005 arrest for punching a traffic agent didn’t take.”

Mort Zuckerman hits Barack Obama for opposing settlements in Israel.
 
Tom Wrobleski sees Dan Donovan edging closer. “[S]ome observers believe the longer Donovan waits to make an announcement, the more likely it is that he will run.”

Dick Ravitch says he and David Paterson “are totally in synch” on the issue of borrowing.

E.J. McMahon says the budget is Paterson’s last chance to salvage his legacy.

Paterson may make a furlough proposal.

The plan was met with “indifference” by Democrats.

Buffalo News: “‘The governor has the right to manage the size of the state work force. He doesn’t need the Legislature to authorize him to do anything in that regard,’ said Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver.”

Richard Brodsky wants the AG’s office to be transformed into “the base for Albany reform efforts.”

The Post wishes Albany acted more like Brentwood.

Juan Gonzalez: “Given that 30% of Arizona’s population is Hispanic and 10% is Native American, you can bet many dark-skinned legal residents and citizens will be victims of this new police authority.”

A reason not to boycott Arizona Iced Tea: It’s brewed in New York.

Bill Clinton’s niece is on food stamps, says Page Six.

And Michael Harris has video of Bloomberg saying the city can’t prevent Wal-Mart from opening a store here.

Morning Read: Arizona Protest, Serrano & Velazquez