Slideshow: CEO Carol Bartz Faces Trouble at Yahoo

Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz has attracted her share of attention and controversy since she took over the company at the beginning of 2009. Kara Swisher reported yesterday that Ms. Bartz will lose three of her top executives by Friday of this week.

 

 

Hillary Schneider, Yahoo's executive vice president, is expected to leave along with ...

 

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David Ko, Yahoo's head of U.S. Audience.

 

And Jimmy Pitaro, Yahoo's VP of Media.

 

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Ms. Bartz told The Wall Street Journal last week that some executives at her company "don't want to move as fast as we want to move." Ms. Swisher was quick to point out that Ms. Bartz hired these people.

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The idea of other people not moving fast enough is not new to Ms. Bartz. In her first summer with the company, Ms. Bartz took a two-week leave for medical reasons. "One last thing before I go," she wrote to her staff in an email. "I've noticed that since the reorg, people seem like they're waiting for something. I'm not sure if it's a sugar-low or what, but we need to stop waiting and get moving. Good things do not come to those who wait, they come to those who make things happen."

 

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According to Ms. Swisher, Yahoo has called upon the crisis-management PR firm, Abernathy MacGregor, to help manage the fall-out from the recent departures.

 

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The Associated Press reported this spring that Ms. Bartz was the highest paid American executive in 2009. Her pay package was worth $47.2 million, more than half of which was stock options to incentivize a turn-around at the company.

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Also this spring, Ms. Bartz was seated at the White House Correspondents Dinner with the Jonas Brothers and Mary J. Blidge.

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Ms. Bartz is also known for small outbursts in public forums. In May of this year, Ms. Bartz told TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington to "fuck off," after he pressed her about search advertising and Google. "And that one I meant," she added.

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Earlier this month, Ms. Bartz told Reuters she had low hopes for Apple's iAd service. "That's going to fall apart for them," she said. "Advertisers are not going to have that type of control over them. Apple wants total control over those ads." This was read by some as an overt critique of Apple CEO Steve Jobs for being too controlling of his company.

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