Barron: ‘They Were Afraid Of Us’

By most accounts, Charles Barron’s run for governor was a disappointment. His newly-hatched Freedom Party came in last place, below the Manhattan Madam and the Rent Is Too Damn High Party. With only 20,000 votes, the party was 30,000 short of grabbing a ballot line for the next election. Adding insult to injury, the Green Party did make the 50,000 threshhold after years of falling short.

But Barron said he was forging ahead.

“Our objective was to give birth to a new party and four months ago, 43,000 signatures, and now 20,000 votes later we are launching our party and we are planning for our founding convention. So while we would have loved to have the 50,000 votes and then a state-recognized party, we are not waiting for the state to determine if we are going to be a party or not,” he said.

He said the founding convention would be in February during Black History Month, at a venue to be determined. From there, he said the plan remained the same–to field a viable slate of candidates in 2012 and beyond.

Barron added that the Freedom Party was operating with little in the way of resources–he said they raised between $30,000 and $40,000 dollars–and he noted that Kristin Davis and Jimmy McMillan benefited from the free media that came after the circus of a debate, even though Barron scored himself and Hawkins as the winners on substance.

“I am not disappointed. We didn’t come behind the Rent is Too Damn High and the Madam. That was the media we had to go up against. They had major media and I was whited out from the media. They had major media. The Rent Is Too Damn Guy he was on the front of every newspaper,” he said. “When you get name recognition and media hype you are going to get some votes. And that’s what he and the madam got.”

The party’s vote total was only 5,000 more than Barron’s tally for Congress in 2006. Three-quarters of his vote came from the five boroughs. 

“We had the votes out there but I don’t think we have developed yet the mechanism or the infrastructure to get at them,” he said.

And Barron continued to heap scorn on Cuomo, especially after Cuomo’s victory speech, in which he called on New Yorkers of different races and classes to come together.

“What was that he said in his speech? We chose unity over division. And he mentioned black and white together. Well why didn’t you think of that when you put your slate together?” he said. “And then he had a white night. Everybody on stage was white–his family and his handlers.”

“They are going to regret–regret!–supporting this man when it comes to budget balancing time,” he said. “You watch.”

 

Barron: ‘They Were Afraid Of Us’