Byte Hogs: U.S. Data Consumption and Spending on Data Explodes

Judging by the declining revenues of traditional news organizations, record labels and movie studios, it would seem the techno-utopians are correct that information in the internet ages wants to be free.

Sadly, consuming it continues to cost more than ever.

According to GigaOm, Americans are on track to consume roughly double the amount of data they did in 2009 — much of it high-quality articles, photos, music and video.

But they are also paying roughly double what they did in 2007, when the iPhone was introduced. Back then the average revenue per byte for big carriers like Verizon and AT&T was $8 a month. Now it’s $16.70.

Many mobile analysts speculated that the end of unlimited smartphone plans, replaced by tiered pricing, would slow data consumption. Instead, analysts now expect monthly mobile usage in the U.S. to top one exabyte — a billion gigabytes — by the end of 2010.

bpopper [at] observer.com

@benpopper

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Byte Hogs: U.S. Data Consumption and Spending on Data Explodes