Census: Manhattan is a Lonely Place

Ask any debauched soul trolling the Meatpacking District on a Friday night, any divorcée attending another fascinating talk at the 92nd

Ask any debauched soul trolling the Meatpacking District on a Friday night, any divorcée attending another fascinating talk at the 92nd Street Y, any Yankees shortstop, and all will tell you the same thing: Manhattan can be a lonely place.

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Thanks to the latest batch of Census data and the fine folks at the Citizens Housing and Planning Council, we now have the maps to prove it.

They determined the make-up of households in the five boroughs,  and in a city where 33 percent of people live alone, every neighborhood south of Harlem has around one in two people living by themselves. The one exception is the East Village/Lower East Side, where only four in ten people live alone.

Meanwhile, the outer reaches of the outer boroughs have the highest concentrations of nuclear families. Looks like Park Slopes and the rest of Brownstone Brooklyn need to pop out a few more babies if they ever hope to compete with New Dorp or Forest Hills.

Looking for love? Try the Chelsea Hotel. >>

mchaban [at] observer.com | @mc_nyo

Census: Manhattan is a Lonely Place