This interactive documentary tops our list of best-ever Web objects

Pine Point started off as a book but quickly morphed into something that could only exist online: a scrapbook (of sorts) that uses films, old photos, and audio recordings to tell the true story of a small Canadian town that simply disappeared one day.

Created by the Goggles—two guys who used to be the creative team behind Adbusters magazine—and produced by the National Film Board of Canada, Pine Point takes about 20 minutes to explore (and that’s if you race through, as we did the first time). It contains at least a few surprises; parts of it will definitely bring tears to your eyes. We don’t want to give too much away (and strongly encourage you to see for yourself). But we can’t think of a narrative-based Web object—the Goggles call it an “interactive documentary”—that’s taken better advantage of the medium. The Internet has a new heart now, and it’s as big as the whole (Canadian) outdoors.

This post is from Observer Short List—an email of three favorite things from people you want to know. Sign up to receive OSL here. This interactive documentary tops our list of best-ever Web objects