$5.7 million in federal grants to 17 N.J. towns for crime-fighting technologies

NEWARK – Attorney General Paula T. Dow Wednesday announced that the Division of Criminal Justice is awarding $5.7 million in

NEWARK – Attorney General Paula T. Dow Wednesday announced that the Division of Criminal Justice is awarding $5.7 million in federal grants to 17 New Jersey cities that are facing high levels of violent crime.

In a release,  Dow explained that the funds – to be distributed as grants of $500,000 for the larger cities and $250,000 for the smaller cities – may be used for various technologies, including:

  • “Eye in the Sky” closed-circuit TV cameras with gunshot detection capability for targeted enforcement areas;
  • Automated License Plate Readers for patrol cars, which can automatically identify vehicles connected to a crime or to a criminal offender;
  • Mobile Data Terminals for patrol cars; and
  • Equipment needed to convert to a countywide or regional dispatch system.

Cities that are allocated funds will have the option of applying to use them to pay for personnel needed to support the use of the technology.  The $5.75 million is a one-time source of funding distributed by the Attorney General’s Office using money provided by the U.S. Department of Justice under the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program.

Grants of $500,000 each will be made available to police departments in six cities with a population of at least 75,000.  These “Tier One” cities, listed in descending order based on the amount of violence experienced, are:

  • Newark
  • Camden
  • Jersey City
  • Trenton
  • Paterson
  • Elizabeth

Grants of $250,000 each will be made available to police departments in 11 cities with a population under 75,000.  These “Tier Two” cities, listed in descending order of violence, are:

  • Irvington
  • Atlantic City
  • Plainfield
  • East Orange
  • Orange
  • Pleasantville
  • Asbury Park
  • New Brunswick
  • Passaic
  • Vineland
  • Bridgeton
$5.7 million in federal grants to 17 N.J. towns for crime-fighting technologies