What Made Archbishop Dolan Famous in Milwaukee Hasn't Saved Him From Losing Here

Archbishop Dolan had had it—he took to his blog.

“Last time I consulted an atlas, it is clear we are living in New York, in the United States of America—not in China or North Korea. In those countries, government presumes daily to ‘redefine’ rights, relationships, values, and natural law. There, communiqués from the government can dictate the size of families, who lives and who dies, and what the very definition of ‘family’ and ‘marriage’ means.”

The head of the nation’s second-largest Catholic archdiocese and the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, a man 60 Minutes had declared “The American Pope” only months before, felt himself staring into the abyss. And the abyss seemed to be staring back: New York was on the eve of voting in gay rights—at the urging of a Catholic governor, no less!—and his months of trying to stop it had come to naught. So he did what a lot of us do and vented on the Internet, seemingly resigned but combative nonetheless.

It was 9:26 a.m. on June 14—10 days, it turned out, before gay marriage would pass.

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What Made Archbishop Dolan Famous in Milwaukee Hasn't Saved Him From Losing Here