Intensity Rising in Marc Spitz's New York

Sometimes, when he is walking his dogs, he imagines they are kids and longs for “just this” and not to

Sometimes, when he is walking his dogs, he imagines they are kids and longs for “just this” and not to have to be “such a raw nerve when you’re walking down the street.”

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But, still, he keeps writing .

At the moment, he is working on a documentary about the rise and fall of music journalism from jazz through R&B to the current realm of the blogosphere. “Take away Almost Famous, and what else has explored that life? It’s an interesting life and they’re crazy people. They’re sort of intense in their own way.”

It is an intensity that Spitz himself possesses, and for all its isolating effects, it has something of the idealist-in-the-face-of-extinction about it.

He returned to the events of the night before when he had been with the cast of his play at rehearsals: “I was outside on the stoop of the theatre, and I was like, god, I’m still here. I’m smoking a cigarette–why am I smoking a cigarette? When is this going to change? And I realized that – that it’s just not going to change.”

The stalwart of old Ludlow Street looked through his dark glasses at the café with its mint-green walls and cupcakes on the counter.

“And there’s like a beauty in that.”

Intensity Rising in Marc Spitz's New York