A Piece of Work: Watching Bravo’s Art Reality Show So You Don’t Have To – Episode 1

Well, no reason, except that some copycat artists wind up making work so blatantly borrowed that it gets them booted off television before they get a chance to take off their shirts onscreen. It doesn’t help that when we asked Mr. Nonis if he had any other artistic influences besides Haring, he said: “I can’t really voice that. When I started painting it just poured out of me and it was unconscious. I never studied art that way. I went to museums like everyone but I never really delved in the art movements and studied artists like that. When it came out, it really felt like it came out of me.”

So. What have we learned here? We’ve learned that producing self-indulgent artwork that just happens to look like someone else’s artwork but maybe not quite as good disqualifies one from becoming the Next Great Artist. As judge Bill Powers put it, channeling Picasso channeling T.S. Eliot, “Good artists borrow, great artists steal.” Let’s hope Mr. Nonis at least managed to pilfer some art supplies from the studio before he was sent packing.

CONCLUSION: While a red herring may divert attention from one’s transgressions, in the world of contemporary art, a red Haring only calls attention to one’s creative shortcomings.

editorial@observer.com

 

A Piece of Work: Watching Bravo’s Art Reality Show So You Don’t Have To – Episode 1