Park Slope Is Alive and Kicking Bourgie Booty

Is Park Slope dead? Yes, Eustace Tilley, of course it is. It died years ago. But washed ashore on the

Still smilin'. (Getty)

Is Park Slope dead? Yes, Eustace Tilley, of course it is. It died years ago. But washed ashore on the East River’s bay in Brooklyn, the old Park Slope decomposed and fertilized the neighborhood that it has become today. It is merely the circle of life: reborn with a silver spoon, a stroller, and Caribbean nanny.

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Just as Fifth Avenue in Manhattan garnered prosperity and luxury at the turn of the 20th century, Fifth Avenue in Brooklyn is doing the same at the turn of the 21st century. National chains—Barnes and Noble and Starbucks—have spread to the neighborhood, but so have yoga shops, children’s stores, and some Brooklyn favorites: Beacon’s Closet, Bird, Gorilla Coffee and the Chocolate Room.

On Union Street, the 57th Street of the brownstone belt, there is the Park Slope Food Coop. It isn’t Walmart, but it serves as a (relatively) strong community of 15,000 members in which each member works 2.75 hours a month to enjoy the organic and natural fruits of their labor at discounts. (Though some find it easier to send their nannies to work for them.)

So, no, Park Slope is not the home of ritual artists or Bohemian party warehouses anymore, but it is rather a granola compost of downward doggies, kale, and micro-roasters.

Fear not, for those who crave that gritty vibe, there is still Windsor Knot and whatever is left of Inwood.

realestate@observer.com

Park Slope Is Alive and Kicking Bourgie Booty