Extreme Commuters: New York Has More Long-Haul Workers Than Anywhere Else

It’s like a giant game of distance limbo: How far could you go? Sign Up For Our Daily Newsletter Sign

How to get to work? They can't decide.

It’s like a giant game of distance limbo: How far could you go?

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Some are willing to travel more than 90 miles to make it to Manhattan every morning for work, according to WNYC, with New York topping the list of cities with extreme commuters.

Of course, there’s an exodus of families moving further up the Hudson River and deeper into New Jersey with Dutchess, Orange, and Ulster counties receiving a 92 percent increase in commuters to Manhattan. MetroNorth spans out an hour and a half in each direction supporting these weary travelers.

Workers are willing to move farther away, for cheaper housing, because Manhattan has “some of the highest paying jobs in the country,” the radio reporters note.

But one in eight Manhattan workers commutes more than 90 miles away. Some come all the way from Albany, Boston, and Philadelphia to work in the Big Apple. It’s a fun commute of buses, cars, trains, and air.

Yes, air. About 4,00 workers commute to New York in a plane. Every day.

mewing@observer.com

Extreme Commuters: New York Has More Long-Haul Workers Than Anywhere Else