New Round of City Council Maps Released

Due to this decade’s U.S. Census numbers, the New York City Council, like every legislative body the country, was Constitutionally required to adjust its boundaries to reflect population shifts within its jurisdiction. This afternoon, the city’s Districting Commission released its second, and likely final, proposal for the new lines.

Although the commission is technically independent, its lines usually favor the City Council establishment, which appoints many of its members. Accordingly, at an immediate glance, the maps do not appear to be massively different from the draft proposal released earlier this year, which protected most existing legislators, with a couple exceptions.

View below:

Brooklyn:
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Manhattan:
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Queens:
[scribd id=113527906 key=key-1g6uel9wlgbrs6z1vo3f mode=scroll]
The Bronx:
[scribd id=113527675 key=key-17qd2lwoy2x7w8l75rq mode=scroll]
Staten Island:
[scribd id=113527688 key=key-1w87jvks0oyvv7lgvfyq mode=scroll]

New Round of City Council Maps Released