‘Mind Is Outer Space’ at Casey Kaplan Gallery

 

Installation view. (Courtesy Casey Kaplan Gallery)

Installation view. (Courtesy Casey Kaplan Gallery)

“Mind Is Outer Space,” a trippy group show organized by the gallery’s Alice Conconi and Loring Randolph, is as slippery and opaque as a highly polished marble floor. In the back, Haris Epaminonda’s thin but terrifying Pond (2012) plays a snippet of footage of a hula dancer—something Ms. Epaminonda might have seen on Cypriot television as a child—forward and backward, with uncanny, elastic reversals, to the sound of Leadbelly’s “In the Pines.” At one point, as if to emboss the soul-killing melancholy of mechanical reproduction even more deeply into the already ample melancholy of the singer’s piercing voice, the dancer seems to sing along to the word “last,” as in, “Where did you sleep last night?” In the front, Aurélien Froment’s Second Gift (2010) slowly circles a set of wooden blocks in geometric shapes designed by German educational pioneer Friedrich Froebel to teach children to think. “I’m telling you all this really quickly,” says Tiffeni Goesel, a kindergarten teacher, as she lists the multitude of inferences a classroom could draw from the set’s materials and construction. “This could take months to discover!” In between are Matt Hoyt’s Untitled (Group 93) (2010-13), two low shelves holding a collection of small objects that might have been found on a forest floor or been robbed from some elegant medicine pouch, two translucent color-field oil paintings by Markus Amm, a pink rubber ear by Louise Bourgeois, three of Mark Barrow’s elegantly suppurating grids of CMYK dots and an untitled series of candy-bright images by Josh Tonsfeldt, projected on the wall to a deep-bass beat emerging from under the projector. (Through Aug. 2, 2013)

‘Mind Is Outer Space’ at Casey Kaplan Gallery