Morning Read: ‘What’s That, Apple Pie?’

The official Bill de Blasio headshot. (Photo: New Yorkers for de Blasio.)

The official Bill de Blasio headshot. (Photo: New Yorkers for de Blasio.)

As The New York Observer also received this request from Public Advocate Bill de Blasio‘s mayoral campaign, Politicker awards the New York Post a slow round of applause for this one: “No thanks, de Blasio.”

Crain’s New York Business attempted to game out Rev. Al Sharpton‘s endorsement, which, if given, could be expected to go to Mr. de Blasio or former Comptroller Bill Thompson. As a side note, long before Mr. Thompson’s recent speech on Trayvon Martin, Rev. Sharpton publicly criticized the his stop-and-frisk stance–“especially as a black candidate”–in The New York Times.

Mr. Thompson, who is reportedly set to get the Assemblyman Dov Hikind‘s endorsement next week, also spoke to his outreach to the Orthodox Jewish community yesterday. “It is about the issues that affect the Jewish community but I think it’s also about relationships. I’ve worked in the Jewish community for decades,” he proclaimed. “It is part of who I am.”

While Road to City Hall spent a full, 15-hour day with Comptroller John Liu. “White Castle never tasted this good before, and now, I know why. The lady gave me a double,” Mr. Liu exclaimed between stops. “Seriously. Look. Two. Two patties.” Later, at a fried chicken joint near 10 p.m., he orders: “Two thighs and a drumstick. What’s that, apple pie?”

This mayoral election could be a disaster with the new levered machines. “Historically, the machines in communities of color have broken down,” Councilwoman Tish James told Talking Points Memo. “I used to walk around with a screw driver and when we couldn’t get someone from the Board of Elections to come and repair machines.”

Election Day smoothness may depend on how many people turn out–a notoriously difficult variable to predict. The Times nevertheless asked several consultants to do just that, receiving prognostications ranging from 400,000 to 800,000 Democrats, less than the 1.1 million who voted in the 1989 David DinkinsEd Koch primary, but more than 2009’s 330,000 voters.

And Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer ate a cronut.

Morning Read: ‘What’s That, Apple Pie?’