ELEC: aided by donations from Fulop, Sweeney, labor, and Dems Establishment, Jackson smothers Trenton mayoral field

Plainfield Public Works Director Erick Jackson reported a clear-cut advantage over his adversaries and flexed a statewide establishment edge in the local Trenton money game.

The mayoral candidate raised $181,420 to date, including $96,811.80 for this morning’s 29-day report period, according to the state Election Law Enforcement Commission (ELEC).  

Jackson has $72,605.43 cash on hand.

Contributors to the candidate include a pair of warring 2017 gubernatorial prospects: Senate President Steve Sweeney (D-3) ($7,200), the Jersey City Democratic Committee (Mayor Steve Fulop) ($8,200); former U.S. Senator Bob Torricelli, former state Senator Bernard Kenny, and many labor group donations.

The election is on May 13th.

Mercer Deputy Clerk Walker Worthy reported raising $75,087 and $42,701 cash-on-hand.

Former City Police Director Jim Golden and his team raised $67,106 and now have $16,063 cash-on-hand.

Former Housing Authority Director Oliver Leggett raised $8,749 and has $1,100 cash on hand.

Retired soldier Paul Perez raised $14,912 and has $5,230 cash-on-hand.

Councilwoman Kathy McBride raised $13,857 and has $3,668 cash-on-hand.

Worthy, who has the support of many members of the Mercer County Democratic Party, attacked Jackson in the wake of his rival’s filing.

“One of my opponents has not been very honest with the voters of Trenton,” said the mayoral candidate in a statement. “The public record shows that Eric Jackson’s personal finances have been in disarray for a very long time, including two personal property foreclosures ten years apart; three state tax liens; a judgment for an unpaid debt to Fairleigh Dickinson University and a Chapter 7 personal bankruptcy.

“Mr. Jackson has not been forthcoming about this information in two mayoral electionsand has been anything but honest and transparent with the voters of Trenton about his personal finances — even as he calls for honesty and transparency in city government,” Worthy added. “This is the sort of double standard that led to the mess Trenton just went through with the administration of Mayor Tony Mack. We must hold our elected leaders to a higher standard and they must demonstrate they are worthy of the voters’ trust.”

Walker pointed out the following specifics:

  • Jackson and his first wife, Theresa, defaulted on a $56,883 mortgage on a property at 327 Euclid Avenue. The home was put up for auction in 1997 by the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office. 
  • Jackson and his second wife, Wanda, were co-debtors with two others on a property at 1222 Genesee Street that went into foreclosure over a $131,750 mortgage in 2007. 
  • The State of New Jersey filed a tax lien for $888 against Jackson in 2005
  • The State of New Jersey filed a tax lien for $2,2000 against Jackson in 2006.
  • The State of New Jersey filed a tax lien for $1,456 against Jackson in 2007.
  • A court in 2004 ordered Jackson to pay $4,364 in unpaid debt owed to Fairleigh Dickinson University, where Jackson attended college.
  • Jackson field for a Chapter 7 personal bankruptcy in December 1996 
ELEC: aided by donations from Fulop, Sweeney, labor, and Dems Establishment, Jackson smothers Trenton mayoral field