Morning Links: Mean Chelsea Galleries Edition

Galleries in Chelsea, like David Zwirner, are mean. (Photo courtesy nycgo.com)

Galleries in Chelsea, like David Zwirner, are mean. (Photo courtesy nycgo.com)

Some visitors to Chelsea galleries think the workers at the reception desks are just really big meanies. What do you want, a hug and a compliment on your hair? [NYT]

A look at Santa Fe’s legacy of photography exhibitions, and its current spree of exciting ones. [WSJ]

A columnist indulges in the delusion that he runs one of the most important museums in the world, and helpfully offers this clarification: “I didn’t invent London.” [The Guardian]

Burning Man—an art festival in the middle of a desert, far away from civilization though someone still all over our Instagram feed this weekend—had ended. People went. A wooden man burned. [NYT]

“Kim Sears hasn’t been available lately to talk about her artistic efforts—painting portraits of pets—possibly because of her other role, which is to sit in the visitors box at tournaments when her boyfriend, the Scottish tennis player Andy Murray, is engaged in a match.” [The Art Newspaper]

The football hooligans who went to the World Cup actually took some time to see art, which is usually for ninnies. “‘You’d think that people who travel to matches aren’t the typical museum audience,’ says Ivo Mesquita, the director of the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo. ‘But we were proved wrong.'” [The Art Newspaper]

An AC unit at the Galleria Borghese caused irrevocable damage to a priceless Raphael. [The Independent via artnews]

It could be the case that artists (Matisse, Rembrandt, Turner) in their late periods make art that’s far more interesting than at any other point in their career. The young whippersnappers ain’t got nothing on the old guns. [The Guardian]

 

Morning Links: Mean Chelsea Galleries Edition