Art World Abstracts: Devo’s Mark Mothersbaugh Gets a Museum Show, and More!

Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo. (Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo. (Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Frontman for the new wave/post-punk outfit Devo Mark Mothersbaugh is headed to a museum near you. “Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia” opens on Halloween at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver and will travel to eight cities, ending at the Santa Monica Museum of Art in September 2016. The show, curated by Adam Lerner, will take a look at everything from the origins of Devo in the 1970s to Mr. Mothersbaugh’s more recent sculptures made in 2014, called “Orchestrions.” [L.A. Times]

The Metropolitan Opera is recruiting several of the art world’s most recognizable names to create trailers—that’s right, film trailers—to preview operas for the upcoming season. T.J. Wilcox, Paul Chan, and George Condo will each create two-minute films that will be shown worldwide in movie theaters and screened in the lobby of the Met during each production. The Met is also debuting five new paintings by Peter Saul inspired by Mozart’s Le Nozze de Figaro. [The Art Newspaper]

Jerry Saltz has huge praise for Chris Ofili, whose survey “Night and Day” opens at the New Museum today. “Ofili is one of the best painters to have come out of England in the last 60 years. For me, he puts painting through far more enticing paces than Lucien Freud or Francis Bacon… this survey gives the lie to the then-prevalent, always-returning, canard that ‘painting is dead.’” [Vulture]

French collector François Pinault bought a lot of art at FIAC, 37 pieces to be precise, between the main fair at Paris’s Grand Palais and its satellite (Off)icialle. [Bloomberg]

The curator of the German Pavilion for 2015’s Venice Biennale has chosen multiple artists to represent the country in a group show. They are Tobias Zielony, Hito Steyerl, Olaf Nicola, Jasmina Metwaly, and Philip Rizk. [Artforum]

There’s an end in sight for The Broad after all. The deadline for the Bunker Hill museum’s opening has been pushed back for months, but an announcement yesterday reassures that it will open in the fall of 2015. [Curbed Los Angeles]

“What Nerve! Alternative Figures in American Art, 1960 to the Present,” on view athte RISD Museum in Providence is getting quite a bit of attention by New York critics, as it should. Organized by Dan Nadel and Judith Tannenbaum it seeks to present alternate, just as innovative, timelines for figurative painting separate from the widely studied arch for modern and contemporary art that dominates the culture. J. Hoberman reviews the show for the New York Review of Books, and says, “Generally speaking, the art is grotesque, garish and exuberant, cranky, sometimes menacing, often hilarious and, in the case of the Hairy Who and Destroy All Monsters, particularly fresh. Much could be considered representational, albeit with a fondness for squiggly, tubular forms and faces that suggest something splattered against a wall.” [New York Review of Books]

Budapest wins this week’s “scariest public art” honor. Just in time for Halloween, it’s actually quite terrifying: a huge, angry stone giant lifting himself up through the ground. Created by Ervin Herve-Loranth with Gallery Out of Home for Art Market Budapest, Ripped Up appears to be made of stone but is actually lightweight foam covered with grass, so don’t be too frightened. [CityLab]

Art World Abstracts: Devo’s Mark Mothersbaugh Gets a Museum Show, and More!