Art World Abstracts: Gearing Up for Frieze London, and More!

Helly Nahmad Gallery booth at Frieze Masters. (Courtesy Helly Nahmad Gallery)
Helly Nahmad Gallery booth at Frieze Masters. (Courtesy Helly Nahmad Gallery)

Here is some news from across the pond, with festivities about to start for London’s Frieze Week. Colin Gleadell of the Telegraph gives a run down on Frieze Live, the fair’s newest section, and explains that despite the ephemeral nature of some of the performances they are still for sale. Marion Maneker points to Helly Nahmad Gallery’s Frieze Masters booth, which is set up like the messy apartment of an anonymous collector. [Telegraph, Art Market Monitor]

Catastrophe almost struck at Christie’s sale of the collection of Karlheinz and Agnes Essl. Initially, it looked as though the top lot, Gerhard Richter’s Net (1985) wasn’t going to sell at all, but a half hour after the auction closed the work sold for £5.5 million (including the house’s premium). [The Art Newspaper]

Jonathan Jones reviews Richard Tuttle’s Turbine Hall installation. “I enjoyed it at the time. But within – what? – an hour, it was gone from my mind… Admire the colours, and it’s fun – try to fathom it, and you may as well be reading a postmodern edition of Moby-Dick from which the whale hunt has been removed.” [Guardian]

Dealers who have accumulated work by artists that were favorites of Adolph Hitler, like Karl Walther and Georg Kolbe, are looking to sell and capitalize on collectors who like artifacts from the World War II era and get in on a surprisingly growing market. “The major auction houses won’t touch these artists due to their acceptance by and collaboration with the Nazis … (but) there’s a market here,” said Bill Panagopulos, president of Alexander Historical Auctions. [Breitbart]

The Italian culture and tourism ministry is looking to revive a payment system set up in 1982 that allows citizens to pay income and inheritance taxes with artworks, antiques, and even land with “archaeological value.” [Reuters]

Thursday is the annual benefit preview for the International Art and Antiques Show. Here is short chat with England-based antiques dealer Anna Haughton, who began the fair with her husband Brian 26 years ago. [Wall Street Journal]

The Milwaukee Art Museum’s iconic white wings, courtesy Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, are being touched up by painters for the second time since their opening in 2001. [Journal Sentinel] Art World Abstracts: Gearing Up for Frieze London, and More!