On the Market: Barry Diller’s $170M Floating Park on the Hudson

(Heatherwick Studio)

(Heatherwick Studio)

This is not generally the time of year that New Yorkers turn their minds to parks. But IAC chairman Barry Diller and the Hudson River Park Trust have something in mind that begs us to do just that “a $170 million, futuristic park built atop an undulating platform 186 feet off the Hudson River shoreline with a series of wooded nooks and three performance venues, including an amphitheater,” according to the Times.

Somewhat less expensive? Riding the subway. But fares will likely go up in March. The details remain undecided. Commuters, however, will surely pay more. One proposal would increase the base MTA fare by 25 cents, to $2.75, while also increasing the bonus on pay-per-ride Metrocards to 11 percent from 5 percent. Another would reduce pay-per-ride bonuses, keeping the base fare where it is.

Coney Islanders, of course, depend heavily on the subway, residing as they do in one of the city’s farther flung neighborhoods. But one resident, anyway, has bigger fish to fry at the moment. “Igor Oberman, the co-op board president of Trump Village Section 4, filed a libel suit against Julia Bezvoleva last month — claiming her news Web site was scaring away potential buyers and ruining his reputation,” the Post reports.

Perhaps a little holiday shopping might cheer up Mr. Oberman? If so, there is good news. Brooklyn has pop-up yuletide markets as far as the eye can see, the Daily News reports, from Greenpoint to the disgruntled co-op board president’s very own Coney Island.

He will do well to use caution, however, should he decide to take his business to Ditmas Park, says Gothamist. The neighborhood has seen a spate of armed robberies that seem to target twee cafes. Were this not actually rather scary, we might confuse the whole situation for an episode of South Park.

One World Trade Center, of course, is somewhat better insulated against laptop-nabbing gunmen. And New York has a floor-by-floor break down of the building’s new tenants. Though there’s still a fair amount of room.

While some buildings are born anew, others are changed irrevocably. The folks at EV Grieve turn their attention to three structures on a block-long stretch of the Bowery that are undergoing major alterations.

And finally, the Post has an interview with one of our other favorite fretters, Jeremiah Moss, of Vanishing New York fame, on what remains in the city that is still worth worrying about losing.

On the Market: Barry Diller’s $170M Floating Park on the Hudson