Art World Abstracts: The Bramans Behind the ICA Miami, and More!

Norman and Irma Braman are footing the bill for the ICA Miamis massive new building in the Design District. Photo by Gustavo Caballero, courtesy Getty Images)

Norman and Irma Braman are footing the bill for the ICA Miami’s massive new building in the Design District. (Photo by Gustavo Caballero, courtesy Getty Images)

Meet the Bramans. Miami philanthropists Norman and Irma, who made their $2 billion fortune through lucrative auto dealerships and now hold a spot on Forbes’ “400 Wealthiest Americans” list, are the major backers of the new Institute of Contemporary Arts Miami. The museum made its debut during Art Basel Miami Beach last week, as well as broke news that it would be building a permanent space in the Design District on a lot donated by real estate developer and collector Craig Robbins. Mrs. Braman is co-chairwoman of the ICA Miami’s board, and the couple has promised art loans to the institution, as well as just about everything else. Miami Beach developer and former Miami Art Museum (now the Perez Art Museum) Lang Baumgarten discussed the importance of philanthropy like the Braman’s, “The wealth in Miami, by and large, is used more for self-aggrandizement than civic support. I wish the real money would step up to the plate.” [New York Times]

The Daily Beast has a lengthy profile of Paddle8 co-founder, and everyone’s favorite dashing Phillips auctioneer Alexander Gilkes. However, an awful lot of time is spent on his connections to the Royal Family (in town this week watching basketball and visiting museums), his celebrity friends like Jay Z, and his admirable discretion. “If you can’t act in a discreet manner, you won’t have a long career. I respect people’s privacy. Celebrity is not something I consciously pursue.” [Daily Beast]

The Miami graffiti artist hit by a Florida detective’s unmarked car last week during Art Basel Miami Beach has died of his injuries. Delbert Rodriguez Gutierrez, known by his tag “DEMZ,” was hit early in the morning while tagging in Wynwood. The incident overlapped with protests and memorial gatherings for another Miami artist who died last year after a similar run in with Miami police. [Miami Herald]

Harold Ramis’ Ghostbusters II jumpsuit will hit the auction block on December 16 at Nate D. Sanders Auctions. The costume previously belonged to producer Michael C. Gross, and is valued at $20,000. It still retains the original “Spengler” name patch and Ghostbusters II arm patch. [PageSix]

Christie’s President of the Americas Doug Woodham will be leaving the auction house. Steven Murphy only just stepped down, and incoming CEP Patricia Barbizet has announced two new senior roles: Auctioneer Jussi Pylkkänen will become global president, and Stephen Brooks will be promoted to global COO. [Financial Times]

As it turns out, Queen Sonja of Norway is not only an avid collector of contemporary art, but even dabbles herself. She opens up to the Wall Street Journal this morning about visiting Warhol’s Factory, how Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party made her realize she was a feminist, and experimenting with graphic art. [Wall Street Journal]

Art World Abstracts: The Bramans Behind the ICA Miami, and More!