African Development Honcho Emigrates From East Village for $3.55M

Old and new.

Old and new.

Are the CEOs of companies devoted to developing “holistic African investment ecosystems, which stimulate sustainable value creation for all segments of the ecosystem” fond of luxury apartments? One might guess not. The values that underpin an operation like Brian Herlihy‘s Black Rhino, an “owner/developer in over $25 billion of African infrastructure development,” would, by its own estimate,  seem divergent from those that generally inspire the pursuit of rarefied goods.

But then again, any time you see that many buzz words in a corporate mission statement, you can be assured that things like “blue chip” funds, “Global Capital Markets” and “International investors” are not far from the hearts of the parties concerned.

They’re also more like what we’re used to hearing about in connection with multi-million-dollar Manhattan real estate, like the incredibly charming co-op at 430 East 10th Street that Mr. Herlihy just sold off for $3.555 million, according to city records. The buyer was the whimsically-named Novelty Iron Works Trust, with Anthony Bonsignore as trustee. Mr. Bonsignore, it seems, represented another trust back in 2012 in the purchase of a $6.95 million townhouse on the High Line. Perhaps he’s downsizing?

Let there be light.

Let there be light.

In any event, to expand on the theme of nonsensical jargon, the listing shared by Town’s David CarapellaDavid Schneider and Rachel Rainaldi calls the 3,400 square-foot space a “genuine old-world penthouse loft,” the likes of which we’re reasonably sure just doesn’t exist. Still, the co-op has no shortage of old-world charm. Housed in a building that dates to 1920, the apartment employs wood re-purposed from 1860s flooring in kitchen, bathroom, and wine room cabinetry. (The latter, mind you, is a humidity and temperature-controlled “Sommelier inspired wine tasting room” capable of storing more than 500 bottles.)

There’s a peaked skylight that brightens the kitchen and tons of rustic-looking exposed beam, rafter and brick. We just hope the infrastructure and ecosystem are well in hand, but if not, we’re sure Mr. Herlihy wouldn’t mind helping out.

Feeling exposed?

Feeling exposed?

African Development Honcho Emigrates From East Village for $3.55M