Afternoon Bulletin: NYPD Responds to Paris Attack, GroundhogGate Returns, and More

Mayor de Blasio and Commissioner Bratton  are taking new security measures in the wake of the terrorist attack in Paris. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Mayor de Blasio and Commissioner Bratton are taking new security measures in the wake of the terrorist attack in Paris. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The NYPD ramped up security Wednesday in the wake of the terrorist attack at a Paris newspaper office that killed 12 people. A Paris-based NYPD detective visited the scene of the Charlie Hebdo attack and gave detailed information to Commissioner Bill Bratton. Critical response vehicles and heavy weapons officers have been deployed around New York City, and local news organizations could also receive extra protection. Mayor Bill de Blasio held a moment of silence for the deceased at this morning’s NYPD swearing-in ceremony. (Daily News)

The Staten Island Zoo has forbidden Mayor de Blasio from holding the groundhog at the zoo’s Feb. 2 Groundhog Day celebration. Last year Mr. de Blasio dropped “Staten Island Chuck,” who died of internal injuries a week later. This year’s groundhog will be placed in a glass box and nobody will be allowed to touch it–this was the policy before then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg started the tradition of holding the critter. At a press conference on Wednesday, Mr. de Blasio conceded that  “there was not an overwhelming amount of preparation or orientation” for handling the groundhog last year. He also paid tribute to the deceased rodent, saying “May he rest in peace” even though it was later revealed the groundhog was a female named Staten Island Charlotte. (New York Post)

A 74-year-old Connecticut man who would be best friends with Nanny Bloomberg is suing the city for not forcing him to wear a helmet while riding a CitiBike. Ronald Corwin slammed his bike into a concrete barrier last year, and the accident allegedly robbed him of his senses of taste and smell. Mr. Corwin claims the city is reckless and negligent for running a bike-share program without also renting out helmets. (Gothamist)

Graffiti threatening violence against the NYPD was found in Queens Monday. The message, which read “PSA-9 ‘n’ 107 Pct R Next to Die,” was found in the basement of a building at the Pomonok housing project at Parsons Boulevard and 65th Avenue; this area is served by Police Service Area 9 and the 107th Precinct. The NYPD Citywide Vandals Task Force is handling the case. (DNAinfo)

A group of NYU students assisted the city Health Department with a sting investigation last fall. The undergrads were dispatched to 13 hookah bars to take samples of the shisha (substance smoked in the hookah). After testing, every sample was found to contain tobacco, in violation of the city’s 2002 Smoke-Free Air Act.  (Capital New York)

 

Afternoon Bulletin: NYPD Responds to Paris Attack, GroundhogGate Returns, and More