12 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before March 2

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 Talk: “Duologues On Kawara: Tom McCarthy and Simon Critchley” at the Guggenheim As part of exhibition curator Jeffrey Weiss’ “Duologues” series pairing guest speakers in dialogue with On Kawara’s monumental retrospective, author Tom McCarthy will give the first ever ready from his new title Satin Island in addition to selections from his “Eighteen Semiconnected Thoughts on Michel de Certeau, On Kawara, Fly FIshing, and Various Other Things.” Then, prompted by Mr. McCarthy’s reading, philosopher Simon Critchley will read his own new work from the semi-fiction work Memory Theater. — Alanna Martinez Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Avenue, New York, 6:30 p.m., $12, $8 Members
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Opening: “2015 Triennial: Surround Audience” at New Museum It’s that time again: Triennial time! This year’s New Museum Triennial is titled “Surround Audience,” and it will feature 51 artists and collection from 25 countries—many of whom have never shown in the U.S. before. Organized by curator Lauren Cornell and artist Ryan Trecartin, there’s a strong focus on digital media, social media, technology, as well as sound, dance, installation, and video. As the New Museum puts it, the Triennial is “predictive, rather than retrospective,” so we anticipate a glimpse of things to come in the work on offer. — A.M. The New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Talk: Nate Lowman and Collier Schorr on “Deliverance” The Brant Foundation stages two blockbuster shows each year, and so last fall we saw the arrival of “Deliverance,” a show of works by Richard Prince, Christopher Wool, Larry Clark and Cady Noland. It just so happens that after the opening reception for that show, I went to a dinner and was seated next to Nate Lowman, and we had a lovely conversation about it. I can imagine this this talk on Wednesday—in which Mr. Lowman speaks with the photographer Collier Schorr about “Deliverance” as part of The Brant Foundation’s lecture series—will be a lot like my dinnertime chat. Maybe less wine this time, though. — N.F. The Beaux Arts Building at New York University, 34 Stuyvesant Street, New York, 6:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Opening: “Claire Fontaine: Stop Seeking Approval” at Metro Pictures French “collective artist” Claire Fontaine will be showing a series of readymade sculptures and monochrome paintings in “Stop Seeking Approval,” which focuses on themes of theft and protection. The paintings have been made with “anti-climb” paint, which is used on walls and fences in order to discourage trespassers. It’s best not to brush up against the paintings, accidentally or otherwise. — A.M. 519 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Opening: “Mapping Brooklyn” at BRIC House and the Brooklyn Historical Society Map enthusiasts, this is a show for you. BRIC Arts and the Brooklyn Historical Society are co-presenting an exhibition of contemporary artists who work with historic maps and the maps they’ve used as inspiration. Subjects like property ownership, population shifts, and the terrain of the psyche are explored through the work of artists like Jenniger Maravillas, Joyce Kozloff, Jan Rothulzen, and Sarah Williams, among others. Historic maps on view come from the Brooklyn Historical Society’s collection, and the show will be split between the galleries at BRIC House and the Brooklyn Historical Society. An opening reception will be held February 25 at BRIC House. — A.M. BRIC House, 647 Fulton Street and the Brooklyn Historical Society, 128 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Opening: “Three Photographers from the Bronx” The Bronx Museum of the Arts puts the spotlight on three artists native to the city’s Northernmost borough: Jules Aarons, Morton Broffman, and Joe Conzo. All three photographers documented significant social upheaval and change in the Bronx during the 20th century, including the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and Bronx community protests in the 1980s. The exhibition includes 80 artworks, and is an all-too rare chance to take a deep look at New York artists who dedicated their artistic careers to capturing the life of the city they called home. — A.M. Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Opening: “Brett Bigbee: Two Paintings” at Alexandre Gallery This exhibition contains only two paintings: “Josie Over Time” (2011-2015) and “Maxine” (2012-2013). Both paintings were completed by Mr. Brigbee over the last four years in the precise, meticulous, realist style that he’s best known for. Sylvia Yount, curator-in-charge of the American Wing at the Met, wrote of Mr. Bigbee’s work: “If Bigbee’s work is traditional in technique, it is no less modern in its unsettling intensity.” — A.M. Alexandre Gallery, 41 East 57th Street, New York, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Opening: “Alex Da Corte: Die Hexe” at Luxembourg & Dayan Alex Da Corte is building a haunted house inside the Luxembourg & Dayan townhouse. That’s right—you read that correctly. But don’t be too scared. The Observer spoke with Mr. Da Corte about the project, and while the room-size tableaux that will fill the house will resurrect some ghosts, they won’t be the phantom variety. Rather they will be artists who have been influencers in his own work (Mike Kelley and Robert Gober) or ones who have, at one time, lived on the premises, such as The Mamas and The Papas. But the biggest inspiration for the show was his actually his grandmother. In a teaser for the exhibition, the artist dressed as his grandmother and posed with two, large ravens. — A.M. Luxembourg & Dayan, 64 East 77th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Opening: “Empire of the Senseless” at Friedman Benda This group show, which takes its name from novelist, feminist, and punk poet Kathy Acker’s 1988 novel Empire of the Senseless, features the work of Nina Chanel Abney, Natalie Frank, Sara-Vide Ericson, Kristina Jansson, Rosa Loy, and Francesca DiMattio. Through painting, the six artists explore the malleable concept of reality. — A.M. Friedman Benda, 515 West 26th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Performance: The New York Performance Artists Collective presents Cecilia Corrigan's "The Coldest Princess Wave" I very much regret not going to Artists Space last October for the launch of Titanic, the first full-length book by Cecilia Corrigan. Titanic is a wonderfully named book that’s ostensibly poetry, but also not—what it does do is embody the restless, multimedia Ms. Corrigan. The launch party, so I’m told, included bawdy stand up, a reading, performance, video, and it inspired headlines proclaiming her “a poet for an internet era.” Her forays into onstage performance art spiked with satirical talk shows continue with “The Coldest Princess Wave,” put on by the New York Performance Artists Collective. — N.F. The Duplex Cabaret Theatre, 61 Christopher Street, New York, 7 p.m., Tickets $10 in advance, $13 at the door
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SUNDAY MARCH 1 Opening: Henry Taylor at Blum & Poe Henry Taylor’s origin story’s a good one: the decades of weird odd jobs, the manual labor, until his quick rise at a slow age—he was nearly 40 when he got his degree at CalArts, in his 50s when he had a solo show at MoMA PS1, and now nearly 60 as he prepares for a solo show at Blum & Poe. He lives and works in Los Angeles, and his paintings possess that same kind of sprawling soulfulness, washed with sun but bluesy at the core. It’s presented in conjunction with UNTITLED, the wonderful gallery on Orchard Street. — N.F. Blum & Poe, 19 East 66th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24

Talk: “Duologues On Kawara: Tom McCarthy and Simon Critchley” at the Guggenheim
As part of exhibition curator Jeffrey Weiss’ “Duologues” series pairing guest speakers with On Kawara’s monumental retrospective, author Tom McCarthy will give the first ever read from his new title Satin Island in addition to selections from his “Eighteen Semiconnected Thoughts on Michel de Certeau, On Kawara, Fly FIshing, and Various Other Things.” Then, prompted by Mr. McCarthy’s reading, philosopher Simon Critchley will read his own new work from the semi-fiction work Memory Theater. — Alanna Martinez
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Avenue, New York, 6:30 p.m., $12, $8 Members

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25

Opening: “2015 Triennial: Surround Audience” at New Museum
It’s that time again: Triennial time! This year’s New Museum Triennial is titled “Surround Audience,” and it will feature 51 artists and collection from 25 countries—many of whom have never shown in the U.S. before. Organized by curator Lauren Cornell and artist Ryan Trecartin, there’s a strong focus on digital media, social media, technology, as well as sound, dance, installation, and video. As the New Museum puts it, the Triennial is “predictive, rather than retrospective,” so we anticipate a glimpse of things to come in the work on offer. — A.M.
The New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York

Talk: Nate Lowman and Collier Schorr on “Deliverance”
The Brant Foundation stages two blockbuster shows each year, and so last fall we saw the arrival of “Deliverance,” a show of works by Richard Prince, Christopher Wool, Larry Clark and Cady Noland. It just so happens that after the opening reception for that show, I went to a dinner and was seated next to Nate Lowman, and we had a lovely conversation about it. I can imagine this this talk on Wednesday—in which Mr. Lowman speaks with the photographer Collier Schorr about “Deliverance” as part of the Brant Foundation’s lecture series—will be a lot like my dinnertime chat. Maybe less wine this time, though. — N.F.
The Beaux Arts Building at New York University, 34 Stuyvesant Street, New York, 6:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26

Opening: “Claire Fontaine: Stop Seeking Approval” at Metro Pictures
French “collective artist” Claire Fontaine will be showing a series of readymade sculptures and monochrome paintings in “Stop Seeking Approval,” which focuses on themes of theft and protection. The paintings have been made with “anti-climb” paint, which is used on walls and fences in order to discourage trespassers. It’s best not to brush up against the paintings, accidentally or on purpose. — A.M.
519 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: “Mapping Brooklyn” at BRIC House and the Brooklyn Historical Society
Map enthusiasts, this is a show for you. BRIC Arts and the Brooklyn Historical Society are co-presenting an exhibition of contemporary artists who work with historic maps, shown alongside the maps they’ve used for inspiration. Subjects like property ownership, population shifts, and the terrain of the psyche are explored through the work of artists like Jenniger Maravillas, Joyce Kozloff, Jan Rothulzen, and Sarah Williams, among others. Historic maps on view come from the Brooklyn Historical Society’s collection, and the show will be split between the galleries at BRIC House and the Brooklyn Historical Society. An opening reception will be held February 25 at BRIC House.  — A.M.
BRIC House, 647 Fulton Street and the Brooklyn Historical Society, 128 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn

Opening: “Three Photographers from the Bronx”
The Bronx Museum of the Arts puts the spotlight on three artists native to the city’s Northernmost borough: Jules Aarons, Morton Broffman, and Joe Conzo. All three photographers documented significant social upheaval and change in the Bronx during the 20th century, including the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and Bronx community protests in the 1980s. The exhibition includes 80 artworks, and is an all-too rare chance to take a deep look at New York artists who dedicated their artistic careers to capturing the life of the city they called home. — A.M.
Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx

Opening: “Brett Bigbee: Two Paintings” at Alexandre Gallery
This exhibition contains only two paintings: “Josie Over Time” (2011-2015) and “Maxine” (2012-2013). Both paintings were completed by Mr. Brigbee over the last four years in the precise, meticulous, realist style that he’s best known for. Sylvia Yount, curator-in-charge of the American Wing at the Met, wrote of Mr. Bigbee’s work once: “If Bigbee’s work is traditional in technique, it is no less modern in its unsettling intensity.” — A.M.
Alexandre Gallery, 41 East 57th Street, New York, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Opening: “Alex Da Corte: Die Hexe” at Luxembourg & Dayan
Alex Da Corte is building a haunted house inside the Luxembourg & Dayan townhouse. That’s right—you read that correctly. But don’t be too scared. The Observer spoke with Mr. Da Corte about the project, and while the room-size tableaux that will fill the house will resurrect some ghosts, they won’t be of the ghoulish variety. Rather they will be artists who have been influencers in his own work (Mike Kelley and Robert Gober) or ones who have, at one time, lived on the premises, such as the musical group The Mamas and The Papas. But the biggest inspiration for the show was his actually his grandmother. In a teaser for the exhibition, the artist dressed as his grandmother and posed with two, large ravens. — A.M.
Luxembourg & Dayan, 64 East 77th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: “Empire of the Senseless” at Friedman Benda
This group show, which takes its name from novelist, feminist, and punk poet Kathy Acker’s 1988 novel Empire of the Senseless, features the work of Nina Chanel Abney, Natalie Frank, Sara-Vide Ericson, Kristina Jansson, Rosa Loy, and Francesca DiMattio. Through painting, the six artists explore the malleable concept of reality. — A.M.
Friedman Benda, 515 West 26th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27

Opening: Dawn Clements at Pierogi
Expanding on previous themes of domesticity through large-scale drawings, 2010 Whitney Biennial artist Dawn Clements uses flowers to introduce elements of sensuality into her imagery. Ms. Clements is known for using large sheets of glued, folded, and crumpled paper as the foundation of her drawings and watercolors. — A.M.
Pierogi, 177 North 9th Street, Brooklyn, 7-9 p.m.

Performance: The New York Performance Artists Collective presents Cecilia Corrigan’s “The Coldest Princess Wave”
I very much regret not going to Artists Space last October for the launch of Titanic, the first full-length book by Cecilia Corrigan. Titanic is a wonderfully named book that’s ostensibly poetry, but also not—what it does do is embody the restless, multimedia artist who is Ms. Corrigan. The launch party, so I’m told, included bawdy stand up, a reading, performance, video, and it inspired headlines proclaiming her “a poet for an internet era.” Her forays into onstage performance art spiked with satirical talk shows continue with “The Coldest Princess Wave,” put on by the New York Performance Artists Collective. — N.F.
The Duplex Cabaret Theatre, 61 Christopher Street, New York, 7 p.m., Tickets $10 in advance, $13 at the door

SUNDAY MARCH 1

Opening: Henry Taylor at Blum & Poe
Henry Taylor’s origin story’s a good one: the decades of weird odd jobs, the manual labor, until his quick rise at a slow age—he was nearly 40 when he got his degree at CalArts, in his 50s when he had a solo show at MoMA PS1, and now nearly 60 as he prepares for a solo show at Blum & Poe. He lives and works in Los Angeles, and his paintings possess that same kind of sprawling soulfulness, washed with sun but bluesy at the core. It’s presented in conjunction with UNTITLED, the wonderful gallery on Orchard Street. — N.F.
Blum & Poe, 19 East 66th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

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