Art World Abstracts: Berlin’s Bode Museum Exhibits Artwork Damaged in WWII, and More!

The Bode Museum in 1926, before the war. (Photo: Bode Museum website)

The Bode Museum in 1926, before the war. (Photo: Bode Museum website)

The Bode Museum’s exhibition “The Missing Museum: the Berlin Sculpture and Paintings Collections 70 Years After World War II” will display original artworks damaged during the war, as well as reproductions of lost works, and plaster casts of pieces in the collection. Many of the pieces haven’t been shown since 1939, before they were damaged in two 1945 fires that destroyed 400 historic paintings and sculptures. “We will be showing a number of horrendous-looking pieces—works that are so badly damaged that they haven’t been displayed in generations,” said Julien Chapuis, deputy director of the museum. “We want to be brutally honest about the condition of these works so that we can start a dialogue as to how they can be presented in the future.” [Art Newspaper]

The residents of Long Island City are making their voices heard loud and clear in opposition to a new public art project funded by New York City’s Percent for Art initiative. Sunbather, by Israeli-born Ohad Meromi, is a large, bright pink sculpture that resembles a reclining figure, expected to reach completion in summer 2016. But many residents think it’s too big, too colorful, and too expensive. Another local artist even created a sculpture of his own in protest at 23rd and Jackson Avenue. [New York Times]

Painter Michel Leah Keck is suing FX Networks for copyright infringement, after spotting three abstract paintings on an episode of the popular animated cartoon Archer that resembled her work. She is asking for $30,000 per painting, and $150,000 for each if the infringement was intentional. [artnet News]

A lot of people are going to see Grayson Perry’s portraits in the 19th and 20th century rooms at London’s National Portrait Gallery. So many, that the works have set new gallery records for the highest number of visitors to view a temporary exhibition. Up to 250,000 people saw the works, produced for the artist’s Channel 4 series “Grayson Perry: Who Art You?” and museum official estimate over 850,000 people have seen at least one work by Mr. Perry. [Guardian]

Florentine artist Franciabigio’s Portrait of Jacopo Cennini (1523) is the earliest surviving portrait of a gardener. The work, commissioned by the Medici family, captures the likeness of their factor and estate manager. It is featured among 150 artworks from the Royal Collection in “Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden,” an exhibition opening March 20 at the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace. [Art Daily]

Art World Abstracts: Berlin’s Bode Museum Exhibits Artwork Damaged in WWII, and More!