Last Chance to Catch ‘Madame Cezanne’ at the Met

The high-maintenance spouse of one of the world's great colorists is leaving town Sunday

Paul Cézanne, Madame Cézanne (Hortense Fiquet, 1850–1922) in the Conservatory, (1891). (Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Paul Cézanne, Madame Cézanne (Hortense Fiquet, 1850–1922) in the Conservatory,
(1891). (Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s blockbuster, “Madame Cezanne”, closes this Sunday, March 15.

An unprecedented assemblage of 41 oil paintings, watercolors and drawings, plus three rarely exhibited sketchbooks by Cézanne, these works featuring his wife span more than two decades. Our critic David Ebony dubbed the show “a gem of an exhibition, which encapsulates by means of portraits and studies a concise overview of key developments in Cézanne’s landmark achievement that eventually ushered in the Modernist era.”

Historians have battled over whether Mrs. Cezanne, or Hortense Fiquet, was, to put it bluntly, a bit of a pill. Cezanne married her secretly and kept her and later, Paul Jr., his son by her, hidden from his family for years. She is virtually never shown smiling in his work. But Ebony concludes that the artist is using her more as a thematic motif, much as Andy Warhol used Marilyn Monroe.

While at the Met, you can also catch the new “Plains Indians: Art of Earth and Sky” show, featuring art of the Pawnee, Cheyenne, and Blackfeet nations, among others, over centuries.

 

Last Chance to Catch ‘Madame Cezanne’ at the Met