The 2015 Turner Prize Nominees Are Here: 3 Women and An Architecture Collective

Assemble Group Photo 2014 (Photo courtesy of Assemble)

Assemble Group Photo 2014 (Photo courtesy of Assemble)

On Tuesday, the Tate Britain announced the nominees for the 2015 Turner Prize. This year, four British artists with a focus on social consciousness have made the shortlist for the coveted honor: Bonnie Camplin, Janice Kerbel, Nicole Wermers and the collective Assemble, according to a report from the Art Newspaper. While this year’s accompanying exhibition will be held at Tramway in Glasgow, none of the nominees are Scottish nor are they graduates of the Glasgow School of Art—a departure from what has become a trend in past years—and the list is comprised of three women, and a collective.

Each year, the Turner Prize highlights a variety of visual art across Britain, and is given to a British or UK-based artist under 50 years of age. In the past, the Turner Prize has turned heads with its winners and their often unconventional projects, which include a light that simply turned on and off by Martin Creed, and Grayson Perry’s pottery works, which explored death and child abuse.

The winner will be announced December 7, 2015, and will walk away with £25,000. The other shortlisted artists won’t go home empty handed either, and will receive £5,000 each.

Penelope Curtis, director of Tate Britain, will chair her final judging panel before leaving the position. “I think the prize has become more serious,” Ms. Curtis said in an interview with The Guardian. “It has lost some of the sensational aspects it had earlier, and that’s good. In the early days one of the aims was to increase the quality of discussion about contemporary art and I think it has—it’s not so simplistic any more. These artists are posing questions that are hard for all of us.”

Granby Four Streets project by Assemble (Photo courtesy of Assemble).

Granby Four Streets project by Assemble (Photo courtesy of Assemble).

One of the more interesting nominees this year, and a first for the Turner Prize, is the London-based collective Assemble, a group of about 16 artists, designers, and architects. Assemble works in tandem with communities on run-down housing estates in a bid to transform them into sustainable works of art. The project that brought the collective to the attention of the judges was a collaborative project with the residents of Granby Streets in Liverpool, England, where they have attempted to stop a demolition process.

Bonnie Camplin The Military Industrial Complex, South London Gallery, 13–15 June 2015 (Photo:Ollie Hammick/The Artist Cabinet London and South London Gallery)

Bonnie Camplin, The Military Industrial Complex. (Photo: Ollie Hammick/The Artist Cabinet London and South London Gallery)

Bonnie Camplin was nominated for The Military Industrial Complex at the South London Gallery, a project that explores ‘consensus reality’ through drawing, film, performance, music, and writing in the form of a study room.

Janice Kerbel - DOUG 2014 Performed on 1 May 2015 in the Jeffrey Room, The Mitchell Theatre, Glasgow Commissioned by The Common Guild, Glasgow (Photo: Alan Dimmick/Greengrassi, London and Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver)

Janice Kerbel, DOUG (2014) (Photo: Alan Dimmick/Greengrassi, London and Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver)

Commissioned by the Common Guild of Glasgow, Janice Kebel is nominated for her operatic comedic work, DOUG. The piece features nine songs chronicling nine catastrophic events a person faces in their life, and is performed by six operatic voices. The Canadian-born, London-based artist was influenced by physical comedy, language, and violent animated cartoons for the piece.

Nicole Wermers Infrastruktur 2015 Installation view (Photo courtesy of Herald St, London)

Nicole Wermers Infrastruktur (2015).(Photo courtesy of Herald St, London)

Unique from the other three nominees, Nicole Wermers’ Infrastruktur is the only art piece that could be described as a “traditional” exhibition. German-born Ms. Wermers explored the relationship between design and taste by displaying seats with fur coats sewn onto their backs at the Herald St gallery in Bethnal Green. The simple design challenges the idea of judging things simply by what they look like.

The Turner Prize 2015 exhibition will run from October 1, 2015 through January 17, 2016 at Tramway in Glasgow.

The 2015 Turner Prize Nominees Are Here: 3 Women and An Architecture Collective