Weekend Edition: 7 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before August 11

Lisette, Phyllis Porter Place Setting, from the series "Shared Dining, by Women of York," 2015. (Photo: Courtesy of Susan Meiselas/Three Guineas Fund Project.  © Susan Meiselas)

Lisette, Phyllis Porter Place Setting, from the series “Shared Dining, by Women of York,” 2015. (Photo: Courtesy of Susan Meiselas/Three Guineas Fund Project. © Susan Meiselas)

FRIDAY, AUGUST 7

Opening: “Women of York: Shared Dining” at the Brooklyn Museum
Riffing on The Dinner Party, Judy Chicago’s celebrated installation commemorating women’s achievements in a variety of disciplines, ten women incarcerated at the York Correctional Institution in Connecticut made their own version. Using materials available or allowed within the prison, they’ve crafted amusing table settings that honor women they consider significant, including Princess Diana and Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist for female education.
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., free with museum admission

The Mirror, 1975, Andrei Tarkovsky. (Image: Courtesy of Kino Lorber)

The Mirror, Andrei Tarkovsky, 1975. (Image: Courtesy of Kino Lorber)

Screening: “Andrei Tarkovsky: The Mirror” at the Museum of Arts and Design
As part of the film series “Andrei Tarkovsky, Sculpting in Time” the Museum of Arts and Design presents The Mirror (Зеркало), the Russian experimental film director’s loosely biographical dreamscape, in which a dying poet in his forties recalls his past through a collection of memories, dreams and newsreel footage. Reviewing the 1975 movie, Classic Art Films proclaims “The Mirror is a reflection into the soul of the director, in search of his own spirituality, and the connections to the truths of life.”
MAD Museum, 2 Columbus Circle, New York, 7 p.m., $10

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8

Roy Lichtenstein, Sea Shore, 1964. (Photo: Courtesy Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Collection, © Roy Lichtenstein Foundation)

Roy Lichtenstein, Sea Shore, 1964. (Photo: Courtesy Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Collection, © Roy Lichtenstein Foundation)

Opening: “Roy Lichtenstein: Between Sea and Sky” at Guild Hall
A fascinating survey of the leading Pop Art artist’s land and seascapes, shown in the heart of the art world’s summer paradise, “Roy Lichtenstein: Between Sea and Sky” presents more than 30 colorful works made between 1962 and 1992 at East Hampton’s Guild Hall. From experimental pieces incorporating patterned plastics, to silkscreen editions and paintings, the exhibition celebrates nature as a vital source of artistic inspiration to the iconic artist.
Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, 4-6 p.m.

John Tenniel, Nothing but a pack of cards! 1885. Gift of Arthur A. Houghton, Jr., The Morgan Library & Museum, Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

John Tenniel, Nothing but a pack of cards! 1885. Gift of Arthur A. Houghton, Jr., The Morgan Library & Museum, Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Talk: “The Story of Alice: Lewis Carroll and the Secret History of Wonderland” at the Morgan Library & Museum
In conjunction with the Morgan’s exhibition “Alice: 150 Years of Wonderland,” Robert Douglas-Fairhurst—author of the recently published Lewis Carroll biography The Story of Alice—talks about the friendship between Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) and Alice Liddell, the child who inspired the Alice stories, and the cultural impact of the Alice books. Visit the enchanting exhibition before or after the talk, and pick up a signed copy of the book.
The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Avenue, New York, 2 p.m., free with museum admission

Sylvie Fleury, It Might As Well Rain Until September, 2012. (Photo: Courtesy Eric Firestone Gallery)

Sylvie Fleury, It Might As Well Rain Until September, 2012. (Photo: Courtesy the artist and Salon 94)

Opening: “All Killer No Filler” at Eric Firestone Gallery
A lively group exhibition featuring established and emerging artists, “All Killer No Filler,” offers work that combines an interest in surface substance with ideas about identity, politics and consumption. Derrick Adams’ collaged TVs on paper deal with racial stereotypes in the media; Nari Ward’s altered door from a housing project comments on poverty; and Shoplifter’s sculptures incorporating synthetic hair reflect a desire for individuality.
Eric Firestone Gallery, 4 Newtown Lane, East Hampton, 6-9 p.m.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 9

The Westerlies. (Photo:  © 2015 Sasha Arutyunova)

The Westerlies. (Photo: © 2015 Sasha Arutyunova)

Performance: “Second Sundays” at Pioneer Works
Pioneer Works, in the heart of Red Hook, is one of the best spots for art enthusiasts to spend a Sunday afternoon. This Sunday brings us an exhibition of Robin Renee Hasty’s glass plate portraits of people who identify as genderqueer, open studios with the Pioneer Works artists-in-residence and site-specific performances all set to live music from the jazz and classical brass quartet The Westerlies and electro-pop musician Janka Nabay, known in Sierra Leone as the King of Bubu.
Pioneer Works, 159 Pioneer Street, Brooklyn, 4-10 p.m., $10 suggested donation

MONDAY, AUGUST 10

The Wright. (Photo © Peter Aaron/ESTO)

The Wright. (Photo © Peter Aaron/ESTO)

Happy Hour: “Summer Punch Happy Hour” at The Wright
Come for champagne punch featuring such exotic flavors as raspberry peach and cucumber mint at the Guggenheim Museum’s design-winning restaurant The Wright, and then stay for the performance of artist duo Gerald & Kelly’s “Timelining,” which explores familial and romantic relationships thorough storytelling and dance.
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York, 5–8 p.m., $40

Weekend Edition: 7 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before August 11