Family Style: A Friendly, Sprawling Co-op Home That Belies Its Address

A pre-war Park Avenue co-op with family-friendly tendencies. (The Corcoran Group)

A pre-war Park Avenue co-op with family-friendly tendencies. (The Corcoran Group)

For a particular set—those who prefer a stroll by the Met, a view of the tulips on Park in the spring, a doorman in a formal uniform in a white-glove building—1100 Park Avenue is a perfect fit.

The den looks like you might actually be able to sit in it! (The Corcoran Group)

The den looks like you might actually be able to sit in it! (The Corcoran Group)

“There are 10-foot ceilings—it’s unusual because on all of Park Avenue, only a few buildings have this,” Corcoran broker Cathy Franklin told the Observer as we entered the foyer of a 10th-floor, 4,000-square-foot co-op currently listed for $9.85 million. The ceilings aren’t the only thing that draws eyes upward throughout the apartment—there’s an impressive art collection, as well, including a Lichtenstein in one of the children’s rooms.

That’s not to say the home exudes a museum-like quality. On the contrary, the space is warm and inviting, with a wood-burning fireplace and a grand piano near the windows, so one can take in the south-facing view down Park.

There is a matching fireplace in the equally welcoming library—a room where one might actually sit, instead of quickly passing by for fear of wrinkling a silk sofa cover.

Of course, this is Park Avenue, so the home does have the requisite full dining room adjacent to the eat-in kitchen, as well as a separate staff bedroom and bath.

Of course, a formal dining room-this is Park Avenue, after all. (The Corcoran Group)

Of course, a formal dining room-this is Park Avenue, after all. (The Corcoran Group)

The current owners “brought up their three sons here,” said Ms. Franklin, who shares the listing with Alexis Bodenheimer, as she led us through three additional bedrooms with en-suite closets and three more bathrooms. The south-facing master suite contains a custom, 22-foot-long dressing area that separates the five closets, vanity and bath.

As for potential buyers of the home, its current layout and location are a tip-off. “You’re in the midst of every single school,” Ms. Franklin opined. “It’s a great building; you can walk to every nursery school.”

Family Style: A Friendly, Sprawling Co-op Home That Belies Its Address