On the Market: Stuy-Town Deal Includes Air Rights; Henry Ward Beecher’s Ghost

Rachel/flickr.

Rachel/flickr.

If you can’t afford to live on 57th Street, but you’re keen on a Midtown address (apparently, there are some), you might consider 53rd Street, which the New York Post has dubbed “millionaire’s row.” It’s not too far from the Park, brokers note, and you can be close to tourists.

Meanwhile, the cost of housing isn’t the only thing making it hard for the lower and middle classes to stay in New York; residents who live in public housing complexes in neighborhoods transformed by wealth tell The New York Times that they’ve been priced out of the grocery stores, shops and restaurants that now line their neighborhoods. “As the old Western Beef supermarket turned into the Apple store with the glass staircase, and the pizza place into an eyebrow salon, many residents said they had lost a sense of belonging.”

There has been some musing over how the Stuy-Town deal could be both a big win for the city and a big win for Blackstone. But the mystery has been at least somewhat solved by The Wall Journal, which reports that the real estate giant has the city’s backing to sell the complex’s huge cache of unused air rights to developers elsewhere in the city.

Luxury home sales in the Hamptons have leveled off, as the supply of luxury properties seems to have exceeded the demand, according to Bloomberg, via Crain’s: “People who had the cash, they came out and bought the last couple of years so they’ve kind of leveled off,” Douglas Elliman’s Dottie Herman tells them.

Not that it’s dissuading owners from listing: The Wall Street Journal reports that a Southhampton Art Deco theater turned residence, which once belonged to CBS founder William S. Paley, has hit the market asking $35 million.

Some families move for the sake of their children and others stay put, often in cramped spaces, reasoning that a sense of community and close relationships are not a thing to be taken lightly, The New York Times reports. Even if it means two adults and three kids in one bedroom: “She began searching online for adult bunk beds and eventually found a company that would custom-build a queen over a queen. Now the two older kids sleep on the top bunk together and the baby sleeps with his parents below.”

The Port Authority has decided to host a design competition for the bus terminal, effectively punting any action on the plan to next September, according to Politico New York.

Finally, the ghost of Henry Ward Beecher is living in Brooklyn, according to Gothamist. Well, maybe… there have been spottings in Plymouth Church, where he was once pastor.

On the Market: Stuy-Town Deal Includes Air Rights; Henry Ward Beecher’s Ghost