All Inclusive: A Lincoln Square Three-Bedroom Courts Pied-a-Terre Buyers

The furniture has been custom-designed. (Courtesy the Corcoran Group.)

Much of the furniture has been custom-designed. (Courtesy the Corcoran Group.)

It was midday when the observer arrived at 225 West 60th Street, but it felt more like evening, the pewter sky and spitting rain bestowing a distinctly twilit gloom.

Even the (unused) linens are included. (Courtesy the Corcoran Group)

Even the (unused) linens are included. (Courtesy the Corcoran Group)

“The only rainy day in weeks,” lamented Corcoran broker Robert Geils as he ushered us into penthouse 2C, a listing that he shares with his wife Maura Geils. “Normally, we have to hit these things,” he said, tapping at the window shades.

True, the fussy weather did mar our enjoyment of the 1,500-square-foot rooftop terrace—accessed via a floating glass staircase off the foyer—but the penthouse’s interiors were a weather-appropriate study in moody blues, grays and blacks, shot through with silver accents.

The seller had thought to stage the apartment, which had gone essentially untouched since the Hudson Condominium’s 2006 completion, but opted for a full overhaul instead, enlisting designer Lesly Zamor.

“There were painted walls, light parquet floors,” said Mr. Geils with distaste. “We had talked about staging and ended up with…”

“A total renovation?” we supplied.

“A restoration. A re-imagination,” he corrected, catching himself with a chuckle at the end. “That’s designer talk. But we thought, let’s try to be an intelligent alternative to redevelopment.”

The terrace measures 1,500 square feet. (Courtesy the Corcoran Group)

The terrace measures 1,500 square feet. (Courtesy the Corcoran Group)

The walls are now covered in textured gray silk, the floors are an espresso-stained oak and the furniture, much of it with contemporary Art Deco lines rendered in velvet, is custom. Which will make it quite a shame if the buyer does not want the apartment fully furnished, especially as all the fixings are included in the $6 million asking price.

It has, in other words, pied-à-terre written all over it. And with three bedrooms and three full baths tucked into 2,040 square feet, it would certainly make a convenient place for hosting out-of-town visitors. Even the flowers were included, Mr. Geils added, stroking the petals of a hydrangea. This did not seem all that generous to us, given flowers’ relatively brief lifespan. But this, as it turned out, had also been fashioned with the needs of busy owners in mind. “It’s silk,” he explained.

All Inclusive: A Lincoln Square Three-Bedroom Courts Pied-a-Terre Buyers