On the Market: Landlords Try to Weed Out Airbnb; Causes of NYCHA’s Crime Problem

Young Sok Yun 윤영석/flickr.

Young Sok Yun 윤영석/flickr.

Aby Rosen is trying to raise $30 million for a Seagrams Building restaurant that will replace the Four Seasons, according to Crain’s. As per usual, his methods are a bit over-the-top: “To perk interest and attract attention to the venture, Rosen sent out marketing materials enclosed in a marble box shaped like the famous square pool that sits inside the landmarked restaurant space.” Rosen and the owners of the Four Seasons couldn’t agree on a lease renewal for the space, which has operated in the building since 1959.

Speaking of replacements, the South Bronx’s controversial “Piano District” billboard has been taken down in favor of one hawking Enlightened, an allegedly “good for you” brand of ice cream, according to DNAinfo.

Mandatory inclusionary zoning might not actually be…mandatory? Crain’s reports that to avoid constitutional issues, the mayor’s plan must include a loophole that developments which can argue that they’d rendered “unprofitable” by the requirement could get out of it.

Landlords not hoteliers! The former are increasingly adding riders to leases that explicitly ban Airbnb rentals, DNAinfo reports—a move that is allegedly good at weeding out renters who had planned to use the apartments as hotel spaces for significant portions of the year.

Toll Brothers plans to offer buyer incentives to move some of its New York City condos, according to Bloomberg. “There are certain units in certain locations within a building that are hot, and then there are other units that may be in a dark, cold corner that you have to incentivize a bit more,” Chief Executive Officer Douglas Yearley said on the company’s earnings conference call. The move would also seem to suggest a potential slackening of the less expensive luxury market, in addition to the trophy one.

A Sutton Place resident who lives at 426 E. 58th, next door to the site that the Bauhouse Group plans to build a 90-story residential tower, is no longer fielding unwelcome buyout offers (the 70-year-old was raised in the home and intends to stay there until he dies), but is worried that the construction next door might force an evacuation if it destabilizes his building, according to DNAinfo.

Failures in communication between the police department and NYCHA is partly to blame for public housing’s disproportionately high crime rates, according to The New York Times. Essentially, the police department frequently failed to inform the housing authority when residents were arrested—which would have enabled eviction—but even when NYCHA had such information, it often didn’t act on it, allowing criminals to remain in the housing complexes.

On the Market: Landlords Try to Weed Out Airbnb; Causes of NYCHA’s Crime Problem