Afternoon Bulletin: Inspections Find Homeless Shelters in Dire Need of Repair

A new report by Comptroller Scott Stringer found numerous code violations in homeless and family shelters throughout the city

Comptroller Scott Stringer. (Photo by Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images)

Comptroller Scott Stringer. (Photo by Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images) Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images

A new report by Comptroller Scott Stringer found 18,704 housing and building code violations in homeless and family shelters throughout the city, the result of comprehensive inspections from Dec. 1-16. Some inspections—which found peeling lead paint, broken smoke detectors and vermin infestations, among other issues—resulted in immediate vacate or partial vacate orders, many of which are still in effect. Mayor Bill de Blasio committed to working to improve shelter conditions and eliminate the especially problem-plagued cluster shelters within three years, although Mr. Stringer said that timeframe will put many in danger. “I don’t want anyone refusing to come into a homeless shelter because of bad conditions,” Mr. de Blasio said. (Daily News)

Mr. de Blasio also announced plans to boost the base pay for all city workers to $15 an hour by 2018, a program that is expected to cost $202 million by 2020. Although most of the city’s roughly 300,000 workers already earn $15 an hour or more, the change is expected to impact around 20,000 custodians, crossing guards and teachers in the city’s direct employ and an additional 30,000 employees of independent organizations working with the city. (New York)

Sixteen hotels have announced a plan to curb their greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent within the next decade. The plan—which could attract more environmentally conscious travellers and save the hotels money on operational costs in addition to its direct environmental impacts—is  part of Mr. de Blasio’s campaign to cut the city’s greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. The program hopes to reduce carbon emissions by 32,000 metric tons and save $25 million in energy expenses. (Travel + Leisure)

The sons of the late art dealer Sam Salz are taking legal action against the estate of their stepmother, Janet Traeger-Salz, who died last March, to recover a trio of Impressionist paintings they claim belonged to Mr. Salz’s estate, and so to them as his heirs. The three paintings—by Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Edgar Degas—were each sold by Traeger-Salz, and some may have been sold again since. Marc and Andre Salz have also taken steps to remove lawyer Robert S. Friedman as executor of their father’s estate over his failure to take action against Ms. Traeger-Salz. Salz père, who died in 1981, was a noted international art dealer who specialized in 20th century art, including works by Monet, Renoir, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. (DNAinfo)

Anyone concerned about spending too little on a Friday morning snack can rest easy with the introduction of the Golden Cristal Ube Donut at Williamsburg’s Manila Social Club. The delicacy is crafted from purple ube, decorated with frosting made from Cristal champagne and covered in 24-karat gold. Chef Björn DelaCruz said that some New Yorkers have bought a dozen doughnuts at a time. (Observer)

Afternoon Bulletin: Inspections Find Homeless Shelters in Dire Need of Repair