Bernie Sanders Is Now Fundraising Off Lloyd Blankfein

CLAREMONT, NH - FEBRUARY 02: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) gestures to the crowd after speaking at the Claremont Opera House on February 2, 2016 in Claremont, New Hampshire. The New Hampshire primary is February 9. (Photo by Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images)

Sen. Bernie Sanders. (Photo: Matthew Cavanaugh for Getty Images)

Lloyd Blankfein’s “dangerous moment” is another opportunity for Sen. Bernie Sanders to raise some cash.

A day after the Goldman Sachs CEO, a fellow Brooklyn native, said the Vermont senator’s presidential candidacy “has the potential to be a dangerous moment,” Mr. Sanders blasted out a fundraising appeal ripping Mr. Blankfein for Wall Street’s role in the 2008 financial collapse.

“I have to say, I find it a little beyond comprehension that Lloyd Blankfein would lecture our campaign about ‘dangerous moments’ after Wall Street received huge bailouts from the working families of this country, when their greed and recklessness caused millions of Americans to lose their jobs, livelihoods, and homes just a few years ago. His arrogance has no end,” Mr. Sanders wrote, asking for a $3 contribution.

“Here’s the truth: Wall Street is terrified because we are running a campaign that does not support their agenda,” he added. “They never expected us to battle to a virtual draw in Iowa, and they are starting to get a bit nervous about New Hampshire too.”

Though his rival, Hillary Clinton, barely won Iowa, Mr. Sanders’ campaign has touted the less than 1 percent margin of victory as proof that he, and not the former secretary of state, is on the upswing. As a senator from New York, Ms. Clinton cultivated a close relationship with the financial industry and was paid $675,000 for three speeches by Goldman Sachs after she left the Obama administration, a fact Mr. Sanders has gleefully underscored with liberal voters angry at Wall Street.

Ms. Clinton has taken a tougher tone with the financial industry since the campaign began, arguing her plan to restrict the “shadow banking” sector is stronger and more realistic than Mr. Sanders’ call to break up large financial institutions and reinstate a law enforcing a separation between commercial and investment banking. Liberal economists have praised both plans.

Mr. Blankfein, speaking on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” said Mr. Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, was personalizing attacks against his industry in a way he found deeply troubling.

“It has the potential to personalize it, it has the potential to be a dangerous moment. Not just for Wall Street not just for the people who are particularly targeted but for anybody who is a little bit out of line,” Mr. Blankfein said. “It’s a liability to say I’m going to compromise I’m going to get one millimeter off the extreme position I have and if you do you have to back track and swear to people that you’ll never compromise. It’s just incredible. It’s a moment in history.”

Mr. Blankfein has not officially endorsed Ms. Clinton and contributes to both Democrats and Republicans. His wife, Laura, donated the $2,700 maximum to Ms. Clinton’s 2016 campaign.

Though reliant on small donors, Mr. Sanders has been able to keep pace with Ms. Clinton’s formidable fundraising. His campaign said he raised $20 million in January and $3 million in the 24 hours following the Iowa caucuses.

View the full fundraising email below:

Brothers and Sisters –

The CEO of Goldman Sachs, Lloyd Blankfein, said yesterday our campaign represents a dangerous moment, “not just for Wall Street, but for anyone who is a little bit out of line.”

I have to say, I find it a little beyond comprehension that Lloyd Blankfein would lecture our campaign about “dangerous moments” after Wall Street received huge bailouts from the working families of this country, when their greed and recklessness caused millions of Americans to lose their jobs, livelihoods, and homes just a few years ago. His arrogance has no end.

Now Wall Street is pouring money into other campaigns. But I am here to tell you that we don’t want their money and we don’t want their super PACs. We are going to do it differently. We are going to win together on the strength of millions of small donations.

Make a $3 contribution today to say you have had ENOUGH of Lloyd Blankfein and the billionaire class buying up candidates and elections in this country.

Here’s the truth: Wall Street is terrified because we are running a campaign that does not support their agenda. They never expected us to battle to a virtual draw in Iowa, and they are starting to get a bit nervous about New Hampshire too.

The next primary is less than one week away, and we have a slight lead in the polls despite opposition from the economic and political establishment in the state. But if we stand together, I know that we have a good chance to win next week.

In solidarity,

Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders Is Now Fundraising Off Lloyd Blankfein