Afternoon Bulletin: Liang Attorneys File Motion to Overturn Conviction and More

New York City police officer Peter Liang is escorted out of court after he was charged with manslaughter, official misconduct and other offenses on February 11, 2015.

New York City police officer Peter Liang is escorted out of court after being charged with manslaughter, official misconduct and other offenses on February 11, 2015. (Photo: Spencer Platt for Getty Images)

Lawyers representing former New York City police officer Peter Liang have filed a motion to overturn his Feb. 11 conviction for reckless manslaughter on the grounds that he could not have performed CPR on Akai Gurley after shooting him in 2014 since the NYPD does not give its officers adequate CPR training. According to Liang’s lawyers, it is commonplace for NYPD instructors to simply read out a list of answers for a written CPR exam as cadets take the test, rather than actually teaching their students. Liang’s lawyers also claim that he could not give CPR since he was not aware that he had shot anyone. If his conviction is not overturned, Liang, who is scheduled to be sentenced on April 14, faces up to 15 years in prison. (New York Post)

About a third of New York nannies make upwards of $50,000 a year, according to a recent survey conducted primarily amongst residents of the Upper West Side and Morningside Heights. Of around 150 families surveyed, 24 percent paid their nannies between $50,000 and $75,000 per year, and 8 percent paid more than $75,000 per year. The average annual income in New York is just $53,341, although that figure rises to around $104,000 in Manhattan. Half of nannies made between $35,000 and $50,000 per year, and another 14 percent made between $25,000 and $35,000 per year. (DNAinfo)

A brawl at a Washington Heights club around 6 AM today left five injured, with one seriously wounded. Police are searching for two men who allegedly were involved in the slashing and stabbing of five patrons of the club on Amsterdam Avenue. A 30-year-old man was slashed in the neck and a 44-year-old woman was stabbed in the abdomen—one of them is reportedly in serious condition while the other was stable. Two more men were stabbed in the stomach, and an 18-year-old man was slashed in the chest—these three men were also hospitalized. (Daily News)

Scrapings of skin from under the fingernails of a 17-year-old girl who was murdered in the Bronx in 1989 have been found to match the DNA of Scott Parilla, 46, a longtime suspect in her killing. Noelis Bayanilla was found severely injured on Morris Avenue after being pushed off a building in August 1989, and was able to say relatively little before losing the ability to speak. She died two days after being found, and police were not then able to conclusively link Mr. Parilla to the crime, despite accounts of a man matching his description at the scene. The new DNA evidence, however, has tied him to the incident, and he was arrested after being released from Rikers Island on unrelated charges. (New York Times)

Alex Raij, the proprietor of Ted & Honey, will open a new coffee shop in Cobble Hill with her husband and co-chef Eder Montero. Ms. Raij said the shop, called Tekoá, will aim to break down coffee shop culture while also providing a new hangout for Brooklynites. “I think coffee culture is shrouded in this professionalism that just makes it less joyful to me,” Ms. Raij told Grub Street. The new restaurant will cater to a family-friendly audience, with menu items like “Mom’s grilled cheese” and many other kid-friendly variations. The coffee, from Irving Farm Coffee Roasters, will go for $2.50 a cup — including a free refill. (Grub Street)

Afternoon Bulletin: Liang Attorneys File Motion to Overturn Conviction and More