Developing: More Electors Attempted to Defect From Clinton Than Trump

Despite shaming, Trump officially became president-elect

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump walk off the stage after the final presidential debate at the Thomas & Mack Center on the campus of the University of Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 19, 2016.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump walk off the stage after the final presidential debate at the Thomas & Mack Center on the campus of the University of Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 19, 2016. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

As of this writing, more members of the Electoral College attempted to vote for someone other than Hillary Clinton than those who defected from Donald Trump.

By early evening, Trump had already reached the 270 necessary electoral votes to officially become president-elect, so additional defectors didn’t matter.

Democrats had lobbied for weeks in a futile attempt to get members of the Electoral College to vote for Clinton instead of Trump and hand the presidency over to their preferred candidate. As I wrote late last month, it’s interesting to watch how the Democratic Party went from condemning Trump for suggesting he’d only accept the election results if he won to throwing out multiple excuses as to how the election was stolen from Clinton.

Multiple articles were written—like this one in The New York Times—that either explained electors could vote against their state’s chosen candidate or acting as a guide explicitly telling them to do so.

Trump was accused of “threatening democracy” if he didn’t accept the election results, yet for weeks Democrats have done the same thing and tried to get members of the Electoral College to vote against the will of the people.

Now, Democrats will say that Clinton won the popular vote, therefore the “will of the people” was for her to be president. No, it wasn’t, as American candidates don’t campaign for the popular vote, they campaign to win the popular vote in individual states. So it’s really like 50+ mini elections (because a couple states split Electoral College votes). In that respect, the “will of the people” in 30 states was for Trump to be the president.

The reason Clinton won the popular vote was because many densely populated states (like California and New York) voted for her while more less-populated states voted for Trump. The reason we have the Electoral College is so that those densely populated states don’t get to dictate the agenda for the rest of the country. More states and more demographics have a say.

So in reality, Democrats were asking electors to vote against the will of the people in their states because Clinton lost.

The funny thing is, despite all the lobbying, all the shaming (elector names were released) and all the hemming and hawing from Democrats, more electors defected from Clinton than Trump.

By my current count, four electors successfully defected from Clinton while only two defected from Trump. Another elector—from Colorado—was replaced after he cast his ballot against Clinton, as was one in Minnesota and an elector in Maine switched his ballot to Clinton after initially having his ballot declared invalid for voting for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. So that’s seven attempted or successful Clinton defections and only two Trump defections.

The two Trump defections came from Texas—one voted for Ohio Gov. John Kasich and another voted for Ron Paul (because, Texas).

Four of Clinton defectors came from Washington State. Three banded together and voted for former Secretary of State Colin Powell and the fourth voted for Native-American activists Faith Spotted Eagle. The defectors in Colorado and Minnesota tried to vote for Sanders, but were replaced by electors who would vote for Clinton, as is allowed under state law.

If no one else defects once all the votes are officially counted, Trump will secure the presidency with 304 electoral votes to Clinton’s 228.

Democrats will continue to whine about the popular vote, even though we don’t know what the real popular vote would have been if both candidates campaigned for it. They’ll continue to claim Russia or “fake news” or whatever caused Clinton’s loss. But the fact of the matter is that Clinton was a terrible candidate who ran a poorly-designed campaign and, along with the mainstream media, badly misread the electorate.

Until Democrats accept that, they’ll have trouble winning future elections.

Disclosure: Donald Trump is the father-in-law of Jared Kushner, the publisher of Observer Media.

Developing: More Electors Attempted to Defect From Clinton Than Trump