Greta Garbo’s Waterfront Retreat Is the Ultimate Collectable

The legendary actress lived in the sprawling apartment for over forty years, and it still bears much of her aesthetic

Garbo lived in the apartment until her death in 1990.
Courtesy Halstead Property
One of three bedrooms.
Courtesy Halstead Property
The Scandinavian-influenced formal dining room.
Courtesy Halstead Property
Rose-hued silk.
Courtesy Halstead Property
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The apartment takes up the entire fifth floor of the exclusive co-op.
Courtesy Halstead Property
The home is accessed by a private elevator entrance.
Courtesy Halstead Property
French doors open to a private balcony.
Courtesy Halstead Property
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Lots of wood paneling.
Courtesy Halstead Property
The eat-in kitchen.
Courtesy Halstead Property
Each bedroom has en-suite bath.
Courtesy Halstead Property
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Knotty pine wood paneling.
Courtesy Halstead Property
Garbo was attracted to the apartment partially because of the passing boats.
Courtesy Halstead Property
The boats reminded the Swedish actress of her native Stockholm.
Courtesy Halstead Property

Greta Garbo’s longtime apartment is on the market for the first time since the Swedish star bought it in 1953.

The notoriously reclusive actress resided in the full-floor co-op at 450 East 52nd Street from 1954 until her death in 1990. Garbo left her entire estate, including this three-bedroom, three-bathroom abode, to her niece, Gray Reisfield, per the New York Times.

Encompassing the entire fifth floor of the Campanile, this home is an exclusive Beekman co-op. Garbo was drawn to the space “partly because the passing boats reminded her of her beloved, native Stockholm,” per the listing shared by Halstead brokers William A. Kerr II, William A. Kerr III and Brian Lewis.

Swedish-born actress Greta Garbo was partially attracted to the home because it reminded her of her native Stockholm. General Photographic Agency/Getty Images

Reisfeld and her son, Derek, maintained the apartment after Garbo’s death, and it is “largely unchanged.” This includes the master suite, where the walls are “adorned in Garbo’s favorite rose-hued Fortuny silk, as is the headboard,” as seen in the slideshow above.

The home, listed for $5.95 million, was partially renovated in the nineties, but retains much of Garbo’s touch and aesthetic, including her “signature palette of pink and green hues.”

A private elevator entrance opens in to the formal entry gallery, and the living room includes a working gas fireplace—apparently, Garbo displayed once displayed much of her extensive art collection on the wood-paneled walls, and some of her artwork and French antiques remain in the 2,855-square-foot apartment.

Garbo retired from all cinema at the age of 35, and retreated from the public eye as much as she could—the famously private star used this home as her “resplendent refuge.”

Interested parties should come prepared—the building, where Rex Harrison and Ethel Barrymore also once resided, doesn’t allow financing, so buyers should expect to pay all cash.

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