Spotify Scrubs Hate Music From Service After Charlottesville Violence

Spotify says it's 'not tolerated'

Spotify hate music Charlottesville

Spotify purging its service of violent hate music. Jonathan NackstrandAFP/Getty Images

Amid the public controversy surrounding the white supremacist protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, Spotify is beginning to scrub its service clean of any hate-inspired violent music.

A spokesperson for the music streaming service told TheWrap that they will begin removing music that “favors hatred” immediately.

“The music in our catalog comes from hundreds of thousands of record companies and aggregators all over the world, and those are at first hand responsible for the content they deliver,” the spokesperson said in a statement. “Illegal content or material that favors hatred or incites violence against race, religion, sexuality or the like is not tolerated by us. Spotify takes immediate action to remove any such material as soon as it has been brought to our attention.”

The activity in Charlottesville has received national mainstream media attention as white nationalists protesting the planned removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee have clashed with counter-protesters and deadly violence has ensued. Virginia governor Terry McAuliffe has even declared a state of emergency.

Over the weekend, a car was driven into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one and injuring 19. Elsewhere, two Virginia State Police troopers were killed with a police helicopter lending assistance to the scene crashed. Significant attention has also been paid to President Donald Trump’s public comments regarding the chaos in Charlottesville.

Amid the fallout, Spotify launched it “Patriotic Passion” playlist on Wednesday which includes Jimi Henrix’s “Star-Spangled Banner” riff and Lady Gaga’s “Americano,” per TheWrap. Describing the playlist, Spotify tweeted Wednesday:

Spotify recently surpassed 60 million subscribers as it prepares for an IPO later this year.

Spotify Scrubs Hate Music From Service After Charlottesville Violence