CDC Adds 5 New Destinations to Highest COVID-19 Travel Warning List

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also moved Spain down to less risky Level 3 status.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is among the five new destinations upgraded to ultra-risky Level 4 status by the CDC.

The CDC added five new destinations to its highest Level 4 COVID-19 travel warning list, including four countries in Eastern Europe. Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Moldova and Romania, which were previously designated as Level 4, have all been elevated to the Level 4 “Very High” risk category, as was the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises Americans against traveling to locales listed as Level 4 status; anyone who must travel should be fully vaccinated beforehand. Destinations are given Level 4 “Very High” classification if there are 500 or more new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents within a 28-day time period.

Subscribe to Observer’s Lifestyle Newsletter

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is one of a number of Caribbean locales that the CDC has listed within Level 4 travel warning status; Saint Martin, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Barbados, the Bahamas and Aruba are all currently within the highest do not travel warning level.

The health agency also moved six destinations to Level 3 status, including Spain, which had previously been designated as a Level 4 locale since July. Spain has its own requisites for Americans trying to travel there, however, as tourists from the U.S. are now required to show show proof of full vaccination before entering the European country.

The CDC currently advises unvaccinated Americans to avoid all travel.

It will soon be easier to enter the U.S., though, as starting in November, the United States is easing travel restrictions for foreign visitors, including opening air travel to those coming from 33 countries including members of the E.U., the U.K. and China.

The CDC advises unvaccinated Americans to avoid all international travel, as well as to delay domestic travel, too. The CDC hasn’t issued any final guidance for the holidays just yet, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Chief Medical Advisor to the President, recently said it’s “just too soon to tell” whether or not holiday travel should limited for the second year in a row due to the coronavirus pandemic. CDC Adds 5 New Destinations to Highest COVID-19 Travel Warning List