Google Is Joining Forces With French Carmaker Renault to Make Cars Connected to the Cloud

Google announced a partnership with French carmaker Renault Group to develop a "software-defined vehicle."

Google cloud
Google announces a partnership with Renault Group to develop a "software-defined vehicle."
Pedro Fiúza/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Google (GOOGL) is making another foray into the automobile world, this time through a partnership with French carmaker Renault Group. The internet giant today (Nov. 8) announced a deal with Renault to develop a “software-defined vehicle” that can deliver a wide range of on-demand services and continuous software updates to the car using Google’s artificial intelligence and cloud technology.

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Google has partnered with Renault since 2018 to integrate its Android operating system into Renault’s in-car media displays. Today’s announcement is an expansion on the previous deal. The ultimate goal is to move Renault’s entire operational model to the cloud, the two companies said in a press release.

To drivers, that means future Renault cars will be able to remotely detect and resolve issues in how the vehicle functions as well as personalize a wide range of services depending on a customer’s driving habits.

Cloud-based communication is a standard feature in many new electric vehicles, including Tesla cars. In a press release, Renault Group CEO Luca de Meo said the “complexity of the electronic architecture of cars is increasing exponentially” as a result of customers’ growing expectations. The company didn’t say whether Google’s technologies will be used in its electric vehicles or internal combustion vehicles.

Google has attempted at making automobiles in the past through its self-driving division, Waymo. The unit was eventually spun off as an independent company to focus on developing self-driving softwares, not actual cars.

Google Is Joining Forces With French Carmaker Renault to Make Cars Connected to the Cloud